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Proceedings Paper

In-resist pattern shift metrology
Author(s): Anita Bouma; Bart Smeets; Lei Zhang; Thuy T. T. Vu; Peter de Loijer; Maikel Goosen; Willem van Mierlo; Wendy Liebregts; Bart Rijpers
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Paper Abstract

Scanner induced pattern shifts between layers are a large contributor to DRAM Bitline to Active overlay. One of the main root causes for this Pattern Shift non-Uniformity are lens aberrations. Currently measuring the Bitline to Active overlay requires a decap CDSEM method1. In this paper, an in-resist pattern shift uniformity metrology method is proposed which quantifies the main DRAM Bitline to Active overlay without the necessity to decap. We have designed a high transmission reticle (≥ 60%) to measure the pattern shift non-uniformity between two dense gratings under the rotation angle of the Active layer in both cold and hot lens states. Each module on the reticle contains product-like features and a variety of metrology targets, i.e. alignment and overlay, such that the product-to-product and the productto- metrology pattern shift fingerprints can be measured. OPC is applied to enlarge the overlapping process windows of the metrology targets with respect to the product-like features.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 March 2018
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 10587, Optical Microlithography XXXI, 105871G (20 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2304364
Show Author Affiliations
Anita Bouma, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Bart Smeets, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Lei Zhang, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Thuy T. T. Vu, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Peter de Loijer, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Maikel Goosen, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Willem van Mierlo, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Wendy Liebregts, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)
Bart Rijpers, ASML Netherlands B.V. (Netherlands)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10587:
Optical Microlithography XXXI
Jongwook Kye, Editor(s)

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