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Proceedings Paper

Ophthalmic diagnostics using a new dynamic light scattering fiber optic probe
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Paper Abstract

A new fiber optic probe is developed to study different parts of the eye. The probe positioned in front of an eye, delivers a low power light from a laser diode into the eye and guides the light which is back scattered by different components (aqueous humor, lens, and vitreous humor) of the eye through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The probe provides rapid determination of macromolecular diffusivities and their respective size distributions in the eye lens and the gel-like material in the vitreous humor. We report alpha-crystalline size distributions, as a function of penetration depth, inside the lens and hyaluronic acid molecular size distribution in the vitreous body. In a clinical setting, the probe can be mounted on a slit- lamp apparatus simply by using a H-ruby lens holder. The capability of detecting cataracts, both nuclear and peripheral, in their early stages of formation, in a non invasive and quantitative fashion, has the potential in patient monitoring and in developing and testing new drugs or diet therapies to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The ability to detect biochemical and macromolecular changes in the vitreous structure can be very useful in identifying certain diseases of the posterior chamber, e.g., posterior vitreous detachment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 10 January 1996
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 2632, Lasers in Ophthalmology III, (10 January 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.229574
Show Author Affiliations
Rafat R. Ansari, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)
Kwang I. Suh, NASA Lewis Research Ctr. (United States)
Michael A. DellaVecchia, Wills Eye Hospital (United States)
Stephen Dubin, Drexel Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2632:
Lasers in Ophthalmology III
Reginald Birngruber; Adolf Friedrich Fercher, Editor(s)

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