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Proceedings Paper

Stationary digital intraoral tomosynthesis: demonstrating the clinical potential of the first-generation system
Author(s): Connor Puett; Christina Inscoe; Robert Hilton; Andre Mol; Enrique Platin; Jianping Lu; Otto Zhou
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Paper Abstract

Stationary intraoral tomosynthesis (sIOT) is an experimental imaging approach using a fixed array of carbon nanotubeenabled x-ray sources to produce a series of projections from which three-dimensional information can be reconstructed and displayed. Customized to the dental workspace, the first-generation sIOT tube is compact, easy-to-operate, and designed to interface with standard digital intraoral detectors. The purpose of this work was to explore the utility of the sIOT device across a range of dental pathologies and thereby identify limitations potentially amenable to correction through post-acquisition processing. Phantoms, extracted human teeth, and cadaveric specimens containing caries, fractures, and dilacerated roots, often associated with amalgam restorations, were imaged using tube settings that match the kVp and mA used in conventional clinical 2D intraoral imaging. An iterative reconstruction approach generated a stack of image slices through which the reader scrolls to appreciate depth relationships. Initial experience demonstrated an improved ability to visualize occlusal caries, interproximal caries, crown and root fractures, and root dilacerations when compared to 2D imaging. However, artifacts around amalgam restorations and metal implants proved problematic, leading to the incorporation of an artifact reduction step in the post-acquisition processing chain. These findings support the continued study of sIOT as a viable limited-angle tomography tool for dental applications and provide a foundation for the ongoing development of image processing steps to maximize the diagnostic utility of the displayed images.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 March 2018
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 10573, Medical Imaging 2018: Physics of Medical Imaging, 105730E (9 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2293722
Show Author Affiliations
Connor Puett, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Christina Inscoe, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Robert Hilton, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Andre Mol, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Enrique Platin, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Jianping Lu, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)
Otto Zhou, The Univ. of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10573:
Medical Imaging 2018: Physics of Medical Imaging
Joseph Y. Lo; Taly Gilat Schmidt; Guang-Hong Chen, Editor(s)

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