Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Optics and plasmonics of massless Dirac fermions (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Alexey Belyanin; Yongrui Wang; Zhongqu Long; Mikhail Tokman
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Relativistic Dirac and Weyl fermions were extensively studied in quantum field theory. Recently they emerged in the nonrelativistic condensed-matter setting as gapless quasiparticle states in some types of crystals. Notable examples of 2D systems include graphene and surface states in topological insulators such as Bi2Se3. Their 3D reincarnation is Dirac and Weyl semimetals that were recently discovered experimentally. Most of the research has been focused on their topological properties and electron transport. However, their optical and plasmonic properties are no less exciting. Optical phenomena can provide valuable insight into the fascinating physics of these materials. Moreover, their unique optical properties can be utilized in future optoelectronic devices. I will discuss several examples illustrating these points. They include plasmons and polaritons in Weyl semimetals, nonlinear optical response of graphene and topological insulators in the infrared and THz range, nonlinear generation of THz plasmons, and optical properties of chiral Dirac/Weyl fermions in a quantizing magnetic field.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 March 2018
PDF
Proc. SPIE 10526, Physics and Simulation of Optoelectronic Devices XXVI, 1052619 (14 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2292084
Show Author Affiliations
Alexey Belyanin, Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
Yongrui Wang, Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
Zhongqu Long, Texas A&M Univ. (United States)
Mikhail Tokman, Institute of Applied Physics of the Russian Academy of Sciences (Russian Federation)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10526:
Physics and Simulation of Optoelectronic Devices XXVI
Bernd Witzigmann; Marek Osiński; Yasuhiko Arakawa, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top