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Proceedings Paper

Information broker: a useless overhead or a necessity
Author(s): Jacek Maitan
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Paper Abstract

The richness and diversity of information available over the Internet, its size, convenience of access, and its dynamic growth will create new ways to offer better education opportunities in medicine. The Internet will especially benefit medical training process that is expensive and requires continuous updating. The use of the Internet will lower the delivery cost and make medical information available to all potential users. On the other hand, since medical information must be trusted and new policies must be developed to support these capabilities, technologies alone are not enough. In general, we must deal with issues of liability, remuneration for educational and professional services, and general issues of ethics associated with patient-physician relationship in a complicated environment created by a mix of managed and private care combined with modern information technology. In this paper we will focus only on the need to create, to manage and to operate open system over the Internet, or similar low-cost and easy access networks, for the purpose of medical education process. Finally, using business analysis, we argue why the medical education infrastructure needs an information broker, a third party organization that will help the users to access the information and the publishers to display their titles. The first section outlines recent trends in medical education. In the second section, we discuss transfusion medicine requirements. In the third section we provide a summary of the American Red Cross (ARC) transfusion audit system; we discuss the relevance of the assumptions used in this system to other areas of medicine. In the fourth section we describe the overall system architecture and discuss key components. The fifth section covers business issues associated with medical education systems and with the potential role of ARC in particular. The last section provides a summary of findings.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 January 1996
PDF: 16 pages
Proc. SPIE 2615, Integration Issues in Large Commercial Media Delivery Systems, (3 January 1996); doi: 10.1117/12.229206
Show Author Affiliations
Jacek Maitan, Univ. of North Carolina/Charlotte (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2615:
Integration Issues in Large Commercial Media Delivery Systems
Andrew G. Tescher; V. Michael Bove, Editor(s)

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