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Proceedings Paper

High throughput Raman spectroscopy for host-pathogen interactions (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Anuradha Ramoji; Natalie Toepfer; Jan Rueger; Abdullah S. Mondol; Iwan W. Schie; Ute Neugebauer; Jürgen Popp
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Paper Abstract

Host-pathogen interactions orchestrate the human innate immune system triggering responses from the immune cells which are usually beneficial. However, in some cases the innate immune system overreacts and turns against the host leading to a systematic inflammatory response, especially in immune compromised patients. Major players of the innate immune system are leukocytes, in particular neutrophils, monocytes and lymphocytes. During leukocytes’ confrontation with the pathogens and the associated molecular motifs, various chemical combat strategies are presented by the cell to clear the invading infection. Understanding this pathogen specific chemical signalling cascade will allow early recognition of invading pathogens and help physicians in their therapeutic decision. To probe the cells in their native environment a label-free and non-invasive method is required. One such upcoming method in the diagnostic field is Raman spectroscopy. This technique enables to capture changes within the leukocytes which are triggered upon their encounter with various bacterial and fungal stimuli. For fast and high throughput screening of cells an in-house built high content screening Raman spectrometer has been employed which allows fast recording of Raman spectra from 100,000 cells within a time span of a few hours yielding spectra with high S/N ratio and retaining cell specific information. This platform has been utilized for in-vitro investigation of the leukocytes subtypes’ interaction with fungi, gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. Raman spectral analysis with aid of the chemometric methods provides information on the leukocyte subtypes’ selective response towards particular pathogens.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 March 2018
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Proc. SPIE 10479, Light-Based Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases, 1047903 (14 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2290047
Show Author Affiliations
Anuradha Ramoji, Universitätsklinikum Jena (Germany)
Natalie Toepfer, Universitätsklinikum Jena (Germany)
Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien eV (Germany)
Jan Rueger, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Abdullah S. Mondol, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Iwan W. Schie, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Ute Neugebauer, Universitätsklinikum Jena (Germany)
Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Institute of Physical Chemistry, Abbe Ctr. of Photonics (Germany)
Jürgen Popp, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10479:
Light-Based Diagnosis and Treatment of Infectious Diseases
Tianhong Dai, Editor(s)

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