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Proceedings Paper

Ionosphere and magnetosphere disturbance impact on operation slips of Global navigation satellite systems at mid- and high-latitudes
Author(s): Yu. V. Yasyukevich; I. V. Zhivetiev; A. S. Yasyukevich; S. V. Voeykov; V. I. Zakharov; N. P. Perevalova; N. N. Titkov
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Paper Abstract

We studied the dynamics of the GLONASS and GPS radio physical signal slips, as well as the slips in determining the total electron content (TEC) at the stations in the mid- and high-latitude regions under different geophysical conditions over 2014 Nov - 2015 Jul. At high latitudes, the pseudo-range P1 measurement slip density is shown to be lower for the GLONASS system, than that for GPS. At mid-latitudes, the TEC slip mean density (N1 TECU/min) under quiet geomagnetic conditions practically does not depend on the Kp and AE index behavior, and does not exceed 12%. At high-latitudes, N1 TECU/min in winter is generally higher, than that in the summer, and may reach 50-60%. The N1 TECU/minvariation at highlatitudes correlates with the geomagnetic index behaviors; however, it depends on Kp and AE essentially differently. Under disturbed conditions, N1 TECU/min increases as AE grows more slowly, that it does under quiet conditions. On the contrary, N1 TECU/min growth as Kp increases under disturbed conditions occurs on a factor of 1,5 faster, than it does under quiet geomagnetic conditions. The N1TECU/min value dependences on the ionospheric disturbance index (Wtec) at mid- and high-latitudes are similar. An increase in the TEC slip density, N1TECU/min in wintertime occurs on a factor of 1,5 faster, than it does in summer. Simultaneously, at high-latitudes, the N1TECU/min growth with the Wtec increase occurs on a factor of 2-2,5 faster, than it does at the mid-latitudes.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 November 2017
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 10466, 23rd International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics, 104667M (30 November 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2288765
Show Author Affiliations
Yu. V. Yasyukevich, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
I. V. Zhivetiev, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
Institute of Cosmophysical Researches and Radio Wave Propagation RAS (Russian Federation)
A. S. Yasyukevich, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
S. V. Voeykov, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
V. I. Zakharov, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
M.V. Lomonosov Moscow State Univ. (Russian Federation)
N. P. Perevalova, Institute of Solar-Terrestrial Physics (Russian Federation)
N. N. Titkov, Kamchatka Subsidiary of Unified Geophysical Service (Russian Federation)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10466:
23rd International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics
Gennadii G. Matvienko; Oleg A. Romanovskii, Editor(s)

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