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Proceedings Paper

Noninvasive monitoring of pharmacodynamics in the skin wound healing process using multimodal microscopy (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Jose D. Rico-Jimenez; Jang Hyuk Lee; Aneesh Alex; Eric J. Chaney; Ronit Barkalifa; Eric Olson; David Adams; Marina Marjanovic; Zane A. Arp; Stephen A. Boppart

Paper Abstract

Approximately 29 million Americans have diabetes, and 86 million are living with prediabetes, increasing the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Complications of wound healing in diabetic patients represent a significant health problem. Impaired diabetic wound healing is characterized by reduced collagen production and diminished angiogenesis. During the proliferative phase of wound healing, the injured tissue undergoes angiogenesis, re-epithelialization, and fibroplasia. Monitoring the development of new blood vessels, metabolic changes, and collagen deposition, is critical to elucidate the process of diabetic wound healing and to improve the development of therapeutic drugs. This study employs a custom-built multimodal microscope where Optical Coherence Tomography Angiography (OCTA) is used for studying neovascularization, Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) for NADH/FAD assessment, Second Harmonic Generation (SHG) microscopy for analyzing collagen deposition, and Coherent anti-Stoke’s Raman Scattering (CARS) microscopy for visualizing water/lipid distribution, all together to non-invasively follow closure of a skin wound in healthy diabetic (db/db) mice treated with placebo and angiogenesis-promoting topical formulation (GlaxoSmithKline). The (db/db) mouse model presents hyperglycemia, obesity, and delayed wound healing that is pathologically similar to human type 2 diabetes mellitus. In this ongoing study, the animals are treated once daily for 14 days after wounding. Images of the wound and surrounding areas are taken at different time points for 28 days. In this experiment, the wound healing process is investigated to gain deeper understanding of the drug mechanism. The capability to non-invasively monitor wound healing mechanisms can become a valuable tool in development of new drug compounds for diabetic wound care.

Paper Details

Date Published: 14 March 2018
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Proc. SPIE 10475, Visualizing and Quantifying Drug Distribution in Tissue II, 104750C (14 March 2018); doi: 10.1117/12.2288621
Show Author Affiliations
Jose D. Rico-Jimenez, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Jang Hyuk Lee, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Aneesh Alex, GlaxoSmithKline (United States)
Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Eric J. Chaney, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Ronit Barkalifa, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Eric Olson, GlaxoSmithKline (United States)
David Adams, GlaxoSmithKline (United States)
Marina Marjanovic, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)
Zane A. Arp, GlaxoSmithKline (United States)
Stephen A. Boppart, Univ. of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10475:
Visualizing and Quantifying Drug Distribution in Tissue II
Kin Foong Chan; Conor L. Evans, Editor(s)

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