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Proceedings Paper

Examination of corticothalamic fiber projections in United States service members with mild traumatic brain injury
Author(s): Faisal M. Rashid; Emily L. Dennis; Julio E. Villalon-Reina; Yan Jin; Jeffrey D. Lewis; Gerald E. York; Paul M. Thompson; David F. Tate
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Paper Abstract

Mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI) is characterized clinically by a closed head injury involving differential or rotational movement of the brain inside the skull. Over 3 million mTBIs occur annually in the United States alone. Many of the individuals who sustain an mTBI go on to recover fully, but around 20% experience persistent symptoms. These symptoms often last for many weeks to several months. The thalamus, a structure known to serve as a global networking or relay system for the rest of the brain, may play a critical role in neurorehabiliation and its integrity and connectivity after injury may also affect cognitive outcomes. To examine the thalamus, conventional tractography methods to map corticothalamic pathways with diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) lead to sparse reconstructions that may contain false positive fibers that are anatomically inaccurate. Using a specialized method to zero in on corticothalamic pathways with greater robustness, we noninvasively examined corticothalamic fiber projections using DWI, in 68 service members. We found significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA), a measure of white matter microstructural integrity, in pathways projecting to the left pre- and postcentral gyri – consistent with sensorimotor deficits often found post-mTBI. Mapping of neural circuitry in mTBI may help to further our understanding of mechanisms underlying recovery post-TBI.

Paper Details

Date Published: 17 November 2017
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10572, 13th International Conference on Medical Information Processing and Analysis, 105720D (17 November 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2284569
Show Author Affiliations
Faisal M. Rashid, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Emily L. Dennis, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Julio E. Villalon-Reina, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Yan Jin, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Jeffrey D. Lewis, Uniformed Services Univ. of the Health Sciences School of Medicine (United States)
Gerald E. York, Alaska Radiology Associates (United States)
Paul M. Thompson, Keck School of Medicine, Univ. of Southern California (United States)
Univ. of Southern California (United States)
David F. Tate, Missouri Institute of Mental Health, Univ. of Missouri (United States)
Baylor College of Medicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10572:
13th International Conference on Medical Information Processing and Analysis
Eduardo Romero; Natasha Lepore; Jorge Brieva; Juan David García, Editor(s)

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