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Comparison of fluorescence rejection methods of baseline correction and shifted excitation Raman difference spectroscopy
Author(s): Zhijian Cai; Wenlong Zou; Jianhong Wu
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Paper Abstract

Raman spectroscopy has been extensively used in biochemical tests, explosive detection, food additive and environmental pollutants. However, fluorescence disturbance brings a big trouble to the applications of portable Raman spectrometer. Currently, baseline correction and shifted-excitation Raman difference spectroscopy (SERDS) methods are the most prevailing fluorescence suppressing methods. In this paper, we compared the performances of baseline correction and SERDS methods, experimentally and simulatively. Through the comparison, it demonstrates that the baseline correction can get acceptable fluorescence-removed Raman spectrum if the original Raman signal has good signal-to-noise ratio, but it cannot recover the small Raman signals out of large noise background. By using SERDS method, the Raman signals, even very weak compared to fluorescence intensity and noise level, can be clearly extracted, and the fluorescence background can be completely rejected. The Raman spectrum recovered by SERDS has good signal to noise ratio. It’s proved that baseline correction is more suitable for large bench-top Raman system with better quality or signal-to-noise ratio, while the SERDS method is more suitable for noisy devices, especially the portable Raman spectrometers.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 October 2017
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10461, AOPC 2017: Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging, 104610H (24 October 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2283003
Show Author Affiliations
Zhijian Cai, Soochow Univ. (China)
Wenlong Zou, Soochow Univ. (China)
Jianhong Wu, Soochow Univ. (China)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10461:
AOPC 2017: Optical Spectroscopy and Imaging
Jin Yu; Zhe Wang; Wei Hang; Bing Zhao; Xiandeng Hou; Mengxia Xie; Tsutomu Shimura, Editor(s)

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