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Proceedings Paper

Parasitic pencil beams caused by lens reflections in laser amplifier chains
Author(s): James E. Murray; Bruno M. Van Wonterghem; Lynn G. Seppala; David Ralph Speck; John R. Murray
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Paper Abstract

Reflections from lens surfaces create parasitic beams that can damage optics in high-powered laser systems. These parasitic beams are low in energy initially, because of the low reflectivity of antireflection (AR) coated lens surfaces and because they are clipped by spatial filter pinholes, but subsequent amplification can raise them to damage fluence levels. Also, some of the pencil beams in multipass laser systems become pre-pulses at the output by by-pass of one or more of the passes, arriving at the output ahead of the main pulse in time. They are insidious because pencil beams that are not initially a problem can become so due to a slow degradation of the AR coatings. Both the Nova and Beamlet laser systems at LLNL have had optics damaged by pencil beams. The best solution for pencil beams is to tip the lenses far enough to eliminate them altogether. This is the approach taken for the National Ignition Facility (NIF).

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 December 1995
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 2633, Solid State Lasers for Application to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF), (8 December 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.228267
Show Author Affiliations
James E. Murray, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Bruno M. Van Wonterghem, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Lynn G. Seppala, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
David Ralph Speck, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
John R. Murray, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2633:
Solid State Lasers for Application to Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF)
Michel Andre; Howard T. Powell, Editor(s)

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