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Proceedings Paper

Dispersion-reduction technique using subcarrier multiplexing
Author(s): Paul D. Sargis; Ronald E. Haigh; Kent George McCammon
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Paper Abstract

We have developed a novel dispersion-reduction technique using subcarrier multiplexing which permits the transmission of multiple 2.5 Gbit/s data channels over hundreds of kilometers of conventional fiber-optic cable with negligible dispersion. Using a lithium niobate external modulator having a modulation bandwidth of 20 GHz, we are able to multiplex several high-speed data channels at a single wavelength. At the receiving end, we demultiplex the data and detect each channel using a 2-GHz bandwidth optical detector. All of the hardware in our system consists of off-the-shelf components and can be integrated to reduce the overall cost. We demonstrated our dispersion-reduction technique in a recent field trial by transmitting two 2.5 Gbit/s data channels over 90 km of commercially-installed single-mode fiber, followed by 210 km of spooled fiber. For comparison, we substituted the 300 km of fiber with equivalent optical attenuation. We also ran computer simulations to evaluate link behavior. Technical details and field trial results will be presented.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 December 1995
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 2614, All-Optical Communication Systems: Architecture, Control, and Network Issues, (1 December 1995); doi: 10.1117/12.227835
Show Author Affiliations
Paul D. Sargis, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Ronald E. Haigh, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Kent George McCammon, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 2614:
All-Optical Communication Systems: Architecture, Control, and Network Issues
Vincent W. S. Chan; Robert A. Cryan; John M. Senior, Editor(s)

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