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Proceedings Paper

Revolutionary astrophysics using an incoherent synthetic optical aperture
Author(s): Gerard L. Rafanelli; Christopher M Cosner; Susan B. Spencer; Douglas Wolfe; Arthur Newman; Ronald Polidan; Supriya Chakrabarti
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Paper Abstract

We describe a paradigm shift for astronomical observatories that would replace circular apertures with rotating synthetic apertures. Rotating Synthetic Aperture (RSA) observatories can enable high value science measurements for the lowest mass to orbit, have superior performance relative to all sparse apertures, can provide resolution of 20m to 30m apertures having the collecting area of 8m to 12m telescopes with much less mass, risk, schedule, and cost. RSA is based on current, or near term technology and can be launched on a single, current launch vehicle to L2. Much larger apertures are possible using the NASA Space Launch System.

Paper Details

Date Published: 5 September 2017
PDF: 19 pages
Proc. SPIE 10398, UV/Optical/IR Space Telescopes and Instruments: Innovative Technologies and Concepts VIII, 103980P (5 September 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2272782
Show Author Affiliations
Gerard L. Rafanelli, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (United States)
Christopher M Cosner, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (United States)
Susan B. Spencer, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (United States)
Douglas Wolfe, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (United States)
Arthur Newman, Raytheon Space and Airborne Systems (United States)
Ronald Polidan, Polidan Science Systems & Technologies, LLC (United States)
Supriya Chakrabarti, Univ. of Massachusetts Lowell (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10398:
UV/Optical/IR Space Telescopes and Instruments: Innovative Technologies and Concepts VIII
Howard A. MacEwen; James B. Breckinridge, Editor(s)

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