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Proceedings Paper

High-speed atomic force microscopy for observing protein molecules in dynamic action
Author(s): T. Ando
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Paper Abstract

Directly observing protein molecules in dynamic action at high spatiotemporal resolution has long been a holy grail for biological science. To materialize this long quested dream, I have been developing high-speed atomic force microscopy (HS-AFM) since 1993. Tremendous strides were recently accomplished in its high-speed and low-invasive performances. Consequently, various dynamic molecular actions, including bipedal walking of myosin V and rotary propagation of structural changes in F1-ATPase, were successfully captured on video. The visualized dynamic images not only provided irrefutable evidence for speculated actions of the protein molecules but also brought new discoveries inaccessible with other approaches, thus giving great mechanistic insights into how the molecules function. HS-AFM is now transforming “static” structural biology into dynamic structural bioscience.

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 February 2017
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 10328, Selected Papers from the 31st International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics, 103281R (20 February 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2268795
Show Author Affiliations
T. Ando, Kanazawa Univ. (Japan)
Japan Science and Technology Agency (Japan)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10328:
Selected Papers from the 31st International Congress on High-Speed Imaging and Photonics
T. Goji Etoh; Hiroyuki Shiraga, Editor(s)

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