Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Mid-IR absorbance and its relation to static permittivity as a robust in-field tool tracking oil deterioration
Author(s): Alex Risos; Nicholas Long; Arvid Hunze; Gideon Gouws
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

A study of the link between the infra-red (IR) absorbance and the relative static permittivity Ɛr of liquid hydrocarbons is of special interest for developing in-situ oxidation monitoring tools. In particular, where IR measurements are difficult to implement but cost efficient and durable capacitive probes can be used. This paper will explore this link by exposing a paraffinic hydrocarbon to oxidation in an accelerated degradation process, while measuring the IR absorption and Ɛr values during this process. It is shown to what extent the IR response of the hydrocarbon liquid changes in the 500 to 4000 cm-1 window, and how this can be translated into a measured increase in Ɛr during oxidation time. The correlation coefficient between IR absorbance at around 1720 cm-1 and Ɛr increase with oxidation time was 99.7%. This remarkably good agreement shows that capacitive probes have the potential to be used as a substitutional in-field tool for in-situ degradation monitoring of hydrocarbon liquids.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 May 2017
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 10215, Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIV, 102150O (3 May 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2260953
Show Author Affiliations
Alex Risos, Victoria Univ. of Wellington (New Zealand)
Nicholas Long, Victoria Univ. of Wellington (New Zealand)
Arvid Hunze, Victoria Univ. of Wellington (New Zealand)
Gideon Gouws, Victoria Univ. of Wellington (New Zealand)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10215:
Advanced Environmental, Chemical, and Biological Sensing Technologies XIV
Tuan Vo-Dinh; Robert A. Lieberman, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top