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Proceedings Paper

Ultra-sensing with slit-enhanced infrared spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Thomas G. Mayerhöfer; Richard Knipper; Uwe Hübner; Dana Cialla-May; Karina Weber; Jürgen Popp

Paper Abstract

Infrared spectroscopy enables the label-free detection of structure specific fingerprints of analytes. The sensitivity of corresponding methods can strongly be enhanced by attaching analytes on plasmonic active surfaces.

We introduce a slit array metamaterial perfect absorber (SAMPA) [1] consisting of a dielectric layer sandwiched between two Au layers of which the upper layer is perforated with a periodic array of slits. This structure combines the principle of Extraordinary Optical Transmission (more light is transmitted through a hole than is incident on its surface) with that of Perfect Absorption (reflectance and transmittance are virtually zero). Accordingly, within the slights the electric fields are strongly enhanced and light-matter interaction is correspondingly greatly amplified. Thus, already small concentrations of analytes down to a monolayer can be detected and identified by their spectral fingerprints with a standard mid-infrared spectrometer.

Closely related to the SAMPAs are plasmonic slit absorbers, which simply consist of slit arrays in thin gold layers deposited on a layer of Si3N4.[2] These slit arrays operate like unstructured gold layers if the incident light is polarized parallel to the long slit axes. In contrast, for light polarized perpendicular to the long slit axis, the plasmon is excited. By the introduction of a second slit, which is rotated relative to the first slit, both principal polarization states excite plasmon resonances which can be made to differ in wavelength. As a consequence, the operating wavelength range of this slit array can be tuned by adjusting the polarization state of the incoming light.
    [1] Mayerhöfer, T.G., et al.. ACS Photonics, 2015. 2(11): p. 1567-1575.
    [2] Knipper, R., et. al., in preparation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 21 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10080, Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine XIV, 100800H (21 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2256286
Show Author Affiliations
Thomas G. Mayerhöfer, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)
Richard Knipper, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)
Uwe Hübner, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Dana Cialla-May, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)
Karina Weber, Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)
Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Jürgen Popp, Leibniz-Institut für Photonische Technologien e.V. (Germany)
Friedrich-Schiller-Univ. Jena (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10080:
Plasmonics in Biology and Medicine XIV
Tuan Vo-Dinh; Joseph R. Lakowicz, Editor(s)

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