Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Hypo-fractionated radiation, magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia and a viral immunotherapy treatment of spontaneous canine cancer
Author(s): P. Jack Hoopes; Karen L. Moodie; Alicia A. Petryk; James D. Petryk; Shawntel Sechrist; David J. Gladstone; Nicole F. Steinmetz; Frank A. Veliz; Alicea A. Bursey; Robert J. Wagner; Ashish Rajan; Danielle Dugat; Margaret Crary-Burney; Steven N. Fiering
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

It has recently been shown that cancer treatments such as radiation and hyperthermia, which have conventionally been viewed to have modest immune based anti-cancer effects, may, if used appropriately stimulate a significant and potentially effective local and systemic anti-cancer immune effect (abscopal effect) and improved prognosis. Using eight spontaneous canine cancers (2 oral melanoma, 3 oral amelioblastomas and 1 carcinomas), we have shown that hypofractionated radiation (6 x 6 Gy) and/or magnetic nanoparticle hyperthermia (2 X 43°C / 45 minutes) and/or an immunogenic virus-like nanoparticle (VLP, 2 x 200 μg) are capable of delivering a highly effective cancer treatment that includes an immunogenic component. Two tumors received all three therapeutic modalities, one tumor received radiation and hyperthermia, two tumors received radiation and VLP, and three tumors received only mNP hyperthermia. The treatment regimen is conducted over a 14-day period. All patients tolerated the treatments without complication and have had local and distant tumor responses that significantly exceed responses observed following conventional therapy (surgery and/or radiation). The results suggest that both hypofractionated radiation and hyperthermia have effective immune responses that are enhanced by the intratumoral VLP treatment. Molecular data from these tumors suggest Heat Shock Protein (HSP) 70/90, calreticulin and CD47 are targets that can be exploited to enhance the local and systemic (abscopal effect) immune potential of radiation and hyperthermia cancer treatment.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 February 2017
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 10066, Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment IX, 1006605 (22 February 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2256213
Show Author Affiliations
P. Jack Hoopes, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Karen L. Moodie, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Alicia A. Petryk, Univ. of Bridgeport (United States)
James D. Petryk, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Shawntel Sechrist, St. Johnsbury Animal Hospital (United States)
David J. Gladstone, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Nicole F. Steinmetz, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Frank A. Veliz, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Alicea A. Bursey, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Robert J. Wagner, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Ashish Rajan, Oklahoma State Univ. (United States)
Danielle Dugat, St. Johnsbury Animal Hospital (United States)
Margaret Crary-Burney, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)
Steven N. Fiering, Geisel School of Medicine at Dartmouth (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10066:
Energy-based Treatment of Tissue and Assessment IX
Thomas P. Ryan, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top