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Proceedings Paper

Localization of the transverse processes in ultrasound for spinal curvature measurement
Author(s): Shahrokh Kamali; Tamas Ungi; Andras Lasso; Christina Yan; Matthew Lougheed; Gabor Fichtinger
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Paper Abstract

PURPOSE: In scoliosis monitoring, tracked ultrasound has been explored as a safer imaging alternative to traditional radiography. The use of ultrasound in spinal curvature measurement requires identification of vertebral landmarks such as transverse processes, but as bones have reduced visibility in ultrasound imaging, skeletal landmarks are typically segmented manually, which is an exceedingly laborious and long process. We propose an automatic algorithm to segment and localize the surface of bony areas in the transverse process for scoliosis in ultrasound.

METHODS: The algorithm uses cascade of filters to remove low intensity pixels, smooth the image and detect bony edges. By applying first differentiation, candidate bony areas are classified. The average intensity under each area has a correlation with the possibility of a shadow, and areas with strong shadow are kept for bone segmentation. The segmented images are used to reconstruct a 3-D volume to represent the whole spinal structure around the transverse processes. RESULTS: A comparison between the manual ground truth segmentation and the automatic algorithm in 50 images showed 0.17 mm average difference. The time to process all 1,938 images was about 37 Sec. (0.0191 Sec. / Image), including reading the original sequence file.

CONCLUSION: Initial experiments showed the algorithm to be sufficiently accurate and fast for segmentation transverse processes in ultrasound for spinal curvature measurement. An extensive evaluation of the method is currently underway on images from a larger patient cohort and using multiple observers in producing ground truth segmentation.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 March 2017
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 10135, Medical Imaging 2017: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling, 101350I (27 March 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2256007
Show Author Affiliations
Shahrokh Kamali, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)
Dalhousie Univ. (Canada)
Tamas Ungi, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)
Andras Lasso, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)
Christina Yan, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)
Matthew Lougheed, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)
Gabor Fichtinger, Lab. for Percutaneous Surgery, Queen's Univ. (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10135:
Medical Imaging 2017: Image-Guided Procedures, Robotic Interventions, and Modeling
Robert J. Webster; Baowei Fei, Editor(s)

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