Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Detection of radiation-induced brain necrosis in live rats using label-free time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Brad A. Hartl; Htet S. W. Ma; Shamira Sridharan; Katherine Hansen; Melanie Klich; Julian Perks; Michael Kent; Kyoungmi Kim; Ruben Fragoso; Laura Marcu
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Differentiating radiation-induced necrosis from recurrent tumor in the brain remains a significant challenge to the neurosurgeon. Clinical imaging modalities are not able to reliably discriminate the two tissue types, making biopsy location selection and surgical management difficult. Label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques have previously been shown to be able to delineate human brain tumor from healthy tissues. Thus, fluorescence lifetime techniques represent a potential means to discriminate the two tissues in real-time during surgery. This study aims to characterize the endogenous fluorescence lifetime signatures from radiation induced brain necrosis in a tumor-free rat model. Fischer rats received a single fraction of 60 Gy of radiation to the right hemisphere using a linear accelerator. Animals underwent a terminal live surgery after gross necrosis had developed, as verified with MRI. During surgery, healthy and necrotic brain tissue was measured with a fiber optic needle connected to a multispectral fluorescence lifetime system. Measurements of the necrotic tissue showed a 48% decrease in intensity and 20% increase in lifetimes relative to healthy tissue. Using a support vector machine classifier and leave-one-out validation technique, the necrotic tissue was correctly classified with 94% sensitivity and 97% specificity. Spectral contribution analysis also confirmed that the primary source of fluorescence contrast lies within the redox and bound-unbound population shifts of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. A clinical trial is presently underway to measure these tissue types in humans. These results show for the first time that radiation-induced necrotic tissue in the brain contains significantly different metabolic signatures that are detectable with label-free fluorescence lifetime techniques.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10054, Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic and Surgical Guidance Systems XV, 100540H (19 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2253735
Show Author Affiliations
Brad A. Hartl, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Htet S. W. Ma, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Shamira Sridharan, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Katherine Hansen, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Melanie Klich, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Julian Perks, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Michael Kent, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Kyoungmi Kim, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Ruben Fragoso, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Laura Marcu, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10054:
Advanced Biomedical and Clinical Diagnostic and Surgical Guidance Systems XV
Anita Mahadevan-Jansen; Tuan Vo-Dinh; Warren S. Grundfest, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top