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Respiratory muscle hemodynamic and metabolic adaptations to 16 weeks of training in varsity soccer players: near-infrared spectroscopy measurements during lung function tests (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): R. Luke Harris; Tanya Grob; Komal Sandhu; Timothy Schwab
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Paper Abstract

The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that mobile, wireless near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) instruments can be used during standard lung function tests to measure adaptations in respiratory muscle metabolism over weeks to months. In eight varsity soccer players at 0 weeks and after 16 weeks of routine training, commercially available mobile, wireless NIRS instruments were used to measure oxygenation and hemodynamics in the sternocleidomastoid (SCM, accessory inspiration muscle). During maximal expiratory pressure (MEP) and forced vital capacity (FVC) maneuvers we determined peak or antipeak changes relative to baseline in oxygenation and hemodynamics: Δ%Sat (muscle oxygen saturation), ΔtHb (total hemoglobin), ΔO2Hb (oxygenated hemoglobin), and ΔHHb (deoxygenated hemoglobin). Subjects reported that the average training load was ~13.3 h/week during the 16 study weeks, compared to ~10.4 h/week during 12 prior weeks. After 16 weeks of training compared to 0 weeks we found statistically significant increases in SCM Δ%Sat (57.7%), ΔtHb (55.3%), and ΔO2Hb (56.7%) during MEP maneuvers, and in SCM Δ%Sat (64.8%), ΔtHb (29.4%), and ΔO2Hb (51.6%) during FVC maneuvers. Our data provide preliminary evidence that NIRS measurements during standard lung function tests are sufficiently sensitive to detect improvements or declines in respiratory muscle metabolism over periods of weeks to months due to training, disease, and rehabilitation exercise.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10072, Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XVII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics, 100720V (24 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2253465
Show Author Affiliations
R. Luke Harris, Univ. of Northern British Columbia Prince George Campus (Canada)
Tanya Grob, Univ. of Northern British Columbia Prince George Campus (Canada)
Komal Sandhu, Univ. of Northern British Columbia Prince George Campus (Canada)
Timothy Schwab, Univ. of Northern British Columbia Prince George Campus (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10072:
Optical Diagnostics and Sensing XVII: Toward Point-of-Care Diagnostics
Gerard L. Coté, Editor(s)

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