Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Label-free biomolecular characterization of human breast cancer tissue with stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) spectral imaging (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Fa-Ke F. Lu; David Calligaris; Yuanzhen Suo; Sandro Santagata; Alexandra J. Golby; X. Sunney Xie; Melissa A. Mallory; Mehra Golshan; Deborah A. Dillon; Nathalie Y. R. Agar

Paper Abstract

Stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) microscopy has been used for rapid label-free imaging of various biomolecules and drugs in living cells and tissues (Science, doi:10.1126/science.aaa8870). Our recent work has demonstrated that lipid and protein mapping of cancer tissue renders pathology-like images, providing essential histopathological information with subcellular resolution of the entire specimen (Cancer Research, doi: 10.1158/0008-5472.CAN-16-027). We have also established the first SRS imaging Atlas of human brain tumors (Harvard Dataverse, doi: (doi:10.7910/DVN/EZW4EK). SRS imaging of tissue could provide invaluable information for cancer diagnosis and surgical guidance in two aspects: rapid surgical pathology and quantitative biomolecular characterization. In this work, we present the use of SRS microscopy for characterization of a few essential biomolecules in breast cancer. Human breast cancer tissue specimens at the tumor core, tumor margin and normal area (5 cm away from the tumor) from surgical cases will be imaged with SRS at multiple Raman shifts, including the peaks for lipid, protein, blood (absorption), collagen, microcalcification (calcium phosphates and calcium oxalate) and carotenoids. Most of these Raman shifts have relatively strong Raman cross sections, which ensures high-quality and fast imaging. This proof-of-principle study is sought to demonstrate the feasibility and potential of SRS imaging for ambient diagnosis and surgical guidance of breast cancer.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10069, Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences XVII, 100690R (24 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2253366
Show Author Affiliations
Fa-Ke F. Lu, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
David Calligaris, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Yuanzhen Suo, Shanghai Jiao Tong Univ. (China)
Sandro Santagata, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Alexandra J. Golby, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
X. Sunney Xie, Harvard Univ. (United States)
Melissa A. Mallory, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Mehra Golshan, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Deborah A. Dillon, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)
Nathalie Y. R. Agar, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Harvard Medical School (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10069:
Multiphoton Microscopy in the Biomedical Sciences XVII
Ammasi Periasamy; Peter T. C. So; Karsten König; Xiaoliang S. Xie, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top