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Proceedings Paper

Arbitrary shaping of non-diffracting beams for filamentation and ultrafast laser materials processing (Conference Presentation)
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Paper Abstract

Shaping complex light fields such as nondiffracting beams, provide important novel routes to control laser materials processing. Nondiffracting beams are produced from an interference between waves with an angle kept constant along the propagation direction. These beams are of outmost importance for laser materials processing because they offer invariant light-matter interaction conditions. We have used and developed several families of beams generated with phase and amplitude shaping and we will review their impact for laser surface processing and high aspect ratio laser processing in the bulk of transparent materials. Bessel beams and higher order Bessel beams allow for high aspect ratio channel drilling, elongated void creation in the bulk of transparent media, or tubular damage creation. We will also discuss the impact of accelerating beam shaping, ie beams with a curved main intensity lobe, to dice materials with a curved edge. This project has received funding from the European Research Council (ERC) under the European Union's Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme (grant agreement No 682032-PULSAR).

Paper Details

Date Published: 28 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10120, Complex Light and Optical Forces XI, 101200I (28 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2252784
Show Author Affiliations
François Courvoisier, FEMTO-ST (France)
Ismail Ouadghir-Idrissi, FEMTO-ST (France)
Remi Meyer, FEMTO-ST (France)
Remo Giust, FEMTO-ST (France)
Luc Froehly, FEMTO-ST (France)
Maxime Jacquot, FEMTO-ST (France)
John M. Dudley, FEMTO-ST (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10120:
Complex Light and Optical Forces XI
David L. Andrews; Enrique J. Galvez; Jesper Glückstad, Editor(s)

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