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Proceedings Paper

Use of micro-optical coherence tomography to analyze barrier integrity of intestinal epithelial cells (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Avira Som; Hui Min Leung; Kengyeh Chu; Alex D. Eaton; Bryan P. Hurley; Guillermo J. Tearney

Paper Abstract

The intestinal epithelial barrier provides protection from external threats that enter the digestive system and persist beyond passage through the stomach. The effects of toxic agents on the intestinal epithelial cell monolayer have not been fully characterized at a cellular level as live imaging of this dynamic interplay at sufficient resolution to interpret cellular responses presents technological challenges. Using a high-resolution native contrast modality called Micro-Optical Coherence Tomography (μOCT), we generated real-time 3D images depicting the impact of the chemical agent EDTA on polarized intestinal epithelial monolayers. Within minutes following application of EDTA, we observed a change in the uniformity of epithelial surface thickness and loss of the edge brightness associated with the apical surface. These observations were measured by generating computer algorithms which quantify imaged-based events changing over time, thus providing parallel graphed data to pair with video. The imaging platform was designed to monitor epithelial monolayers prior to and following application of chemical agents in order to provide a comprehensive account of monolayer behavior at baseline conditions and immediately following exposure. Furthermore, the platform was designed to simultaneously measure continuous trans-epithelial electric resistance (TEER) in order to define the progressive loss of barrier integrity of the cell monolayer following exposure to toxic agents and correlate these findings to image-based metrics. This technological image-based experimental platform provides a novel means to characterize mechanisms that impact the intestinal barrier and, in future efforts, can be applied to study the impact of disease relevant agents such as enteric pathogens and enterotoxins.

Paper Details

Date Published: 24 April 2017
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 10068, Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XV, 1006809 (24 April 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2252727
Show Author Affiliations
Avira Som, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
The Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Hui Min Leung, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)
Kengyeh Chu, Duke Univ. (United States)
Alex D. Eaton, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Ctr. (United States)
Bryan P. Hurley, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Mucosal Immunology and Biology Research Ctr. (United States)
Guillermo J. Tearney, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10068:
Imaging, Manipulation, and Analysis of Biomolecules, Cells, and Tissues XV
Daniel L. Farkas; Dan V. Nicolau; Robert C. Leif, Editor(s)

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