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Proceedings Paper

Development of an integrated sub-picometric SWIFTS-based wavelength meter
Author(s): Céline Duchemin; Fabrice Thomas; Bruno Martin; Eric Morino; Renaud Puget; Robin Oliveres; Christophe Bonneville; Thierry Gonthiez; Nicolas Valognes
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Paper Abstract

SWIFTSTM technology has been known for over five years to offer compact and high-resolution laser spectrum analyzers. The increase of wavelength monitoring demand with even better accuracy and resolution has pushed the development of a wavelength meter based on SWIFTSTM technology, named LW-10.

As a reminder, SWIFTSTM principle consists in a waveguide in which a stationary wave is created, sampled and read out by a linear image sensor array. Due to its inherent properties (non-uniform subsampling) and aliasing signal (as presented in Shannon-Nyquist criterion), the system offers short spectral window bandwidths thus needs an a priori on the working wavelength and thermal monitoring.

Although SWIFTSTM-based devices are barely sensitive to atmospheric pressure, temperature control is a key factor to master both high accuracy and wavelength meter resolution. Temperature control went from passive (temperature probing only) to active control (Peltier thermoelectric cooler) with milli-degree accuracy. The software part consists in dropping the Fourier-like transform, for a least-squares method directly on the interference pattern. Moreover, the consideration of the system’s chromatic behavior provides a "signature" for automated wavelength detection and discrimination.

This SWIFTSTM-based new device - LW-10 - shows outstanding results in terms of absolute accuracy, wavelength meter resolution as well as calibration robustness within a compact device, compared to other existing technologies. On the 630 – 1100 nm range, the final device configuration allows pulsed or CW lasers monitoring with 20 MHz resolution and 200 MHz absolute accuracy. Non-exhaustive applications include tunable laser control and frequency locking experiments

Paper Details

Date Published: 20 February 2017
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 10110, Photonic Instrumentation Engineering IV, 1011016 (20 February 2017); doi: 10.1117/12.2249860
Show Author Affiliations
Céline Duchemin, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Fabrice Thomas, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Bruno Martin, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Eric Morino, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Renaud Puget, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Robin Oliveres, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Christophe Bonneville, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Thierry Gonthiez, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)
Nicolas Valognes, RESOLUTION Spectra Systems (France)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10110:
Photonic Instrumentation Engineering IV
Yakov G. Soskind; Craig Olson, Editor(s)

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