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Proceedings Paper

Retrieving the microphysical properties of ice clouds from simultaneous observations by a lidar and an all-sky camera
Author(s): Alexander V. Konoshonkin; Sergey V. Nasonov; Victor P. Galileyskii; Natalia V. Kustova; Anatoli G. Borovoi; Grigorii P. Kokhanenko; Yuri S. Balin; Dmitry V. Kokarev; Alexey I. Elizarov; Alexander M. Morozov
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Paper Abstract

The paper presents the result of simultaneous observation of cirrus clouds by a lidar and an all-sky camera. The observation was started at 17:00, 24 March, 2016 and finished at 09:00, 25 March, 2016. The polarization lidar of V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics was used. The cirrus cloud was formed at 8000 m and went down to 4000 m at the end of observation. The linear depolarization ratio varied from 60% to less than 1%. The layer of quasi-horizontally oriented ice crystals was observed. Simultaneously, the all-sky camera pictured the 22 degrees halos while the lidar measured high depolarization ratio, which means that randomly oriented hexagonal ice particles were forming the cloud. The camera also pictured the Sundogs when the depolarization ratio tended to zero at about 21:30 that definitely indicates the quasi-horizontally oriented hexagonal plates. Absence of the Sundogs in the all-sky pictures while both the lidar sense low depolarization ratio, strong intensity and the specular reflection appears means that the cloud was formed by quasi-horizontally oriented particles with complex shape, i.e. snowflakes. The simultaneous lidar and all-sky camera observations seems to be a very prospective method to retrieve the microphysical properties of cirrus clouds.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 November 2016
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 10035, 22nd International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics, 100353O (29 November 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2248846
Show Author Affiliations
Alexander V. Konoshonkin, National Research Tomsk State Univ. (Russian Federation)
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Sergey V. Nasonov, National Research Tomsk State Univ. (Russian Federation)
V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Victor P. Galileyskii, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Natalia V. Kustova, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Anatoli G. Borovoi, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Grigorii P. Kokhanenko, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Yuri S. Balin, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Dmitry V. Kokarev, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Alexey I. Elizarov, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)
Alexander M. Morozov, V.E. Zuev Institute of Atmospheric Optics (Russian Federation)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 10035:
22nd International Symposium on Atmospheric and Ocean Optics: Atmospheric Physics
Gennadii G. Matvienko; Oleg A. Romanovskii, Editor(s)

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