Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper • new

Cryogenic optical test planning using the Optical Telescope Element Simulator with the James Webb Space Telescope Integrated Science Instrument Module
Author(s): Timothy A. Reichard; Nicholas A. Bond; Bradford W. Greeley; Eliot M. Malumuth; Marcio Melendez; Ron Shiri; Catarina Alves de Oliveira; Scott R. Antonille; Stephan Birkmann; Clinton Davis; William V. Dixon; André R. Martel; Cherie L. Miskey; Raymond G. Ohl; Derek Sabatke; Joseph Sullivan
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

NASA’s James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is a 6.5 m diameter, segmented, deployable telescope for cryogenic infrared space astronomy (~40 K). The JWST Observatory architecture includes the Optical Telescope Element (OTE) and the Integrated Science Instrument Module (ISIM) element that contains four science instruments (SIs), including a guider. The SI and guider units are integrated to the ISIM structure and optically tested at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center as an instrument suite using a telescope simulator (Optical Telescope Element SIMulator; OSIM). OSIM is a high-fidelity, cryogenic JWST telescope simulator that features a ~1.5m diameter powered mirror. The SIs are aligned to the flight structure’s coordinate system under ambient, clean room conditions using optomechanical metrology and customized interfaces. OSIM is aligned to the ISIM mechanical coordinate system at the cryogenic operating temperature via internal mechanisms and feedback from alignment sensors and metrology in six degrees of freedom. SI performance, including focus, pupil shear, pupil roll, boresight, wavefront error, and image quality, is evaluated at the operating temperature using OSIM. The comprehensive optical test plans include drafting OSIM source configurations for thousands of exposures ahead of the start of a cryogenic test campaign. We describe how we predicted the performance of OSIM light sources illuminating the ISIM detectors to aide in drafting these optical tests before a test campaign began. We also discuss the actual challenges and successes of those exposure predictions encountered during a test campaign to fulfill the demands of the ISIM optical performance verification.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 September 2016
PDF: 15 pages
Proc. SPIE 9951, Optical System Alignment, Tolerancing, and Verification X, 99510N (27 September 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2237006
Show Author Affiliations
Timothy A. Reichard, ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States)
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Nicholas A. Bond, ADNET Systems, Inc. (United States)
NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Bradford W. Greeley, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Eliot M. Malumuth, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
KBRwyle Science (United States)
Marcio Melendez, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
KBRwyle Science (United States)
Ron Shiri, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Catarina Alves de Oliveira, European Space Astronomy Ctr. (United States)
Scott R. Antonille, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Stephan Birkmann, European Space Agency (United States)
Clinton Davis, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Genesis Engineering Solutions, Inc. (United States)
William V. Dixon, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
André R. Martel, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
NRC Herzberg Astronomy and Astrophysics (Canada)
Cherie L. Miskey, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Stinger Ghaffarian Technologies, Inc. (United States)
Raymond G. Ohl, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Derek Sabatke, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)
Joseph Sullivan, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9951:
Optical System Alignment, Tolerancing, and Verification X
José Sasián; Richard N. Youngworth, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top