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Proceedings Paper

WFI electronics and on-board data processing
Author(s): Markus Plattner; Sebastian Albrecht; Jörg Bayer; Soeren Brandt; Paul Drumm; Olaf Hälker; Franz Kerschbaum; Anna Koch; Irfan Kuvvetli; Norbert Meidinger; Sabine Ott; Roland Ottensamer; Jonas Reiffers; Thomas Schanz; Konrad Skup; Manfred Steller; Chris Tenzer; Chris Thomas
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Paper Abstract

The Wide Field Imager is one of two instruments on-board the future ATHENA X-ray observatory. Its main scientific objective is to perform a sky survey in the energy range of 0.2 keV up to 15 keV with an end-of-life spectral resolution (FWHM) better than 170 eV (at 7 keV) and a frame rate of at least 200 Hz. The field of view will be 40 arcmin squared wherefore a focal plane array with 4 large sensors each with a size of 512 times 512 pixels will be developed. Additionally, a fast detector with a size of 64 times 64 pixels and a frame rate of 12.5 kHz will be implemented in order to enhance the instrument with high count rate detection of bright sources.

The data processing electronics within the WFI instrument is distributed over several subsystems: DEPFET sensors sensitive in the x-ray energy regime and front-end electronics are located inside the Camera Head. Data pre-processing inside the Detector Electronics will be performed in an FPGA-based frame-processor. FPGA external memory will be used to store offset and noise maps wherefore memory controllers have to be developed. Fast read and write access to the maps combined with robustness against radiation damage (e.g. bit-flips) has to be ensured by the frame-processor design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 11 July 2016
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 9905, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 99052D (11 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2235375
Show Author Affiliations
Markus Plattner, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Sebastian Albrecht, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Jörg Bayer, Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
Soeren Brandt, Technical Univ. of Denmark, National Space Institute (Denmark)
Paul Drumm, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)
Olaf Hälker, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Franz Kerschbaum, Univ. Vienna (Austria)
Anna Koch, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Irfan Kuvvetli, Technical Univ. of Denmark, National Space Institute (Denmark)
Norbert Meidinger, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Sabine Ott, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Roland Ottensamer, Univ. Vienna (Austria)
Jonas Reiffers, Max Planck Institute for Extraterrestrial Physics (Germany)
Thomas Schanz, Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
Konrad Skup, Polish Academy of Science, Space Research Ctr. (Poland)
Manfred Steller, Space Research Institute (Austria)
Chris Tenzer, Univ. Tübingen (Germany)
Chris Thomas, Univ. of Leicester (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9905:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Jan-Willem A. den Herder; Tadayuki Takahashi; Marshall Bautz, Editor(s)

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