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Proceedings Paper

Intensity interferometry: optical imaging with kilometer baselines
Author(s): Dainis Dravins
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Paper Abstract

Optical imaging with microarcsecond resolution will reveal details across and outside stellar surfaces but requires kilometer-scale interferometers, challenging to realize either on the ground or in space. Intensity interferometry, electronically connecting independent telescopes, has a noise budget that relates to the electronic time resolution, circumventing issues of atmospheric turbulence. Extents up to a few km are becoming realistic with arrays of optical air Cherenkov telescopes (primarily erected for gamma-ray studies), enabling an optical equivalent of radio interferometer arrays. Pioneered by Hanbury Brown and Twiss, digital versions of the technique have now been demonstrated, reconstructing diffraction-limited images from laboratory measurements over hundreds of optical baselines. This review outlines the method from its beginnings, describes current experiments, and sketches prospects for future observations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 July 2016
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9907, Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V, 99070M (26 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2234130
Show Author Affiliations
Dainis Dravins, Lund Observatory (Sweden)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9907:
Optical and Infrared Interferometry and Imaging V
Fabien Malbet; Michelle J. Creech-Eakman; Peter G. Tuthill, Editor(s)

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