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Proceedings Paper

Keck Planet Imager and Characterizer: concept and phased implementation
Author(s): D. Mawet; P. Wizinowich; R. Dekany; M. Chun; D. Hall; S. Cetre; O. Guyon; J. K. Wallace; B. Bowler; M. Liu; G. Ruane; E. Serabyn; R. Bartos; J. Wang; G. Vasisht; M. Fitzgerald; A. Skemer; M. Ireland; J. Fucik; J. Fortney; I. Crossfield; R. Hu; B. Benneke
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Paper Abstract

The Keck Planet Imager and Characterizer (KPIC) is a cost-effective upgrade path to the W.M. Keck observatory (WMKO) adaptive optics (AO) system, building on the lessons learned from first and second-generation extreme AO (ExAO) coronagraphs. KPIC will explore new scientific niches in exoplanet science, while maturing critical technologies and systems for future ground-based (TMT, EELT, GMT) and space-based planet imagers (HabEx, LUVOIR). The advent of fast low-noise IR cameras (IR-APD, MKIDS, electron injectors), the rapid maturing of efficient wavefront sensing (WFS) techniques (Pyramid, Zernike), small inner working angle (IWA) coronagraphs (e.g., vortex) and associated low-order wavefront sensors (LOWFS), as well as recent breakthroughs in high contrast high resolution spectroscopy, open new direct exoplanet exploration avenues that are complementary to planet imagers such as VLT-SPHERE and the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI). For instance, the search and detailed characterization of planetary systems on solar-system scales around late-type stars, mostly beyond SPHERE and GPI's reaches, can be initiated now at WMKO.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 July 2016
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9909, Adaptive Optics Systems V, 99090D (26 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2233658
Show Author Affiliations
D. Mawet, California Institute of Technology (United States)
Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
P. Wizinowich, W. M. Keck Observatory (United States)
R. Dekany, California Institute of Technology (United States)
M. Chun, Univ. of Hawaii (United States)
D. Hall, Univ. of Hawaii (United States)
S. Cetre, W. M. Keck Observatory (United States)
O. Guyon, Subaru Telescope, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (United States)
J. K. Wallace, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
B. Bowler, The Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
M. Liu, Univ. of Hawaii (United States)
G. Ruane, California Institute of Technology (United States)
E. Serabyn, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
R. Bartos, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
J. Wang, California Institute of Technology (United States)
G. Vasisht, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
M. Fitzgerald, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
A. Skemer, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
M. Ireland, Australian National Univ. (Australia)
J. Fucik, California Institute of Technology (United States)
J. Fortney, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
I. Crossfield, Univ. of California, Santa Cruz (United States)
Univ. of Arizona (United States)
R. Hu, Jet Propulsion Lab. (United States)
B. Benneke, California Institute of Technology (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9909:
Adaptive Optics Systems V
Enrico Marchetti; Laird M. Close; Jean-Pierre Véran, Editor(s)

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