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Proceedings Paper

The Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) for TMT: data reduction system
Author(s): Gregory Walth; Shelley A. Wright; Jason Weiss; James E. Larkin; Anna M. Moore; Edward L. Chapin; Tuan Do; Jennifer Dunn; Brent Ellerbroek; Kim Gillies; Yutaka Hayano; Chris Johnson; Daniel Marshall; Reed L. Riddle; Luc Simard; Ji Man Sohn; Ryuji Suzuki; James Wincentsen
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Paper Abstract

IRIS (InfraRed Imaging Spectrograph) is the diffraction-limited first light instrument for the Thirty Meter Telescope (TMT) that consists of a near-infrared (0.84 to 2.4 μm) imager and integral field spectrograph (IFS). The IFS makes use of a lenslet array and slicer for spatial sampling, which will be able to operate in 100’s of different modes, including a combination of four plate scales from 4 milliarcseconds (mas) to 50 mas with a large range of filters and gratings. The imager will have a field of view of 34×34 arcsec2 with a plate scale of 4 mas with many selectable filters. We present the preliminary design of the data reduction system (DRS) for IRIS that need to address all of these observing modes. Reduction of IRIS data will have unique challenges since it will provide real-time reduction and analysis of the imaging and spectroscopic data during observational sequences, as well as advanced post-processing algorithms. The DRS will support three basic modes of operation of IRIS; reducing data from the imager, the lenslet IFS, and slicer IFS. The DRS will be written in Python, making use of open-source astronomical packages available. In addition to real-time data reduction, the DRS will utilize real-time visualization tools, providing astronomers with up-to-date evaluation of the target acquisition and data quality. The quick look suite will include visualization tools for 1D, 2D, and 3D raw and reduced images. We discuss the overall requirements of the DRS and visualization tools, as well as necessary calibration data to achieve optimal data quality in order to exploit science cases across all cosmic distance scales.

Paper Details

Date Published: 8 August 2016
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 9913, Software and Cyberinfrastructure for Astronomy IV, 99134A (8 August 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2233076
Show Author Affiliations
Gregory Walth, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Shelley A. Wright, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Jason Weiss, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
James E. Larkin, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Anna M. Moore, Caltech Optical Observatories (United States)
Edward L. Chapin, National Research Council of Canada (Canada)
Tuan Do, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Jennifer Dunn, National Research Council of Canada (Canada)
Brent Ellerbroek, Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory Corp. (United States)
Kim Gillies, Thirty Meter Telescope Observatory Corp. (United States)
Yutaka Hayano, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
Chris Johnson, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Daniel Marshall, Univ. of California, San Diego (United States)
Reed L. Riddle, Caltech Optical Observatories (United States)
Luc Simard, National Research Council of Canada (Canada)
Ji Man Sohn, Univ. of California, Los Angeles (United States)
Ryuji Suzuki, National Astronomical Observatory of Japan (Japan)
James Wincentsen, Caltech Optical Observatories (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9913:
Software and Cyberinfrastructure for Astronomy IV
Gianluca Chiozzi; Juan C. Guzman, Editor(s)

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