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Proceedings Paper

EXPRES: a next generation RV spectrograph in the search for earth-like worlds
Author(s): C. Jurgenson; D. Fischer; T. McCracken; D. Sawyer; A. Szymkowiak; A. Davis; G. Muller; F. Santoro
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Paper Abstract

The EXtreme PREcision Spectrograph (EXPRES) is an optical fiber fed echelle instrument being designed and built at the Yale Exoplanet Laboratory to be installed on the 4.3-meter Discovery Channel Telescope operated by Lowell Observatory. The primary science driver for EXPRES is to detect Earth-like worlds around Sun-like stars. With this in mind, we are designing the spectrograph to have an instrumental precision of 15 cm/s so that the on-sky measurement precision (that includes modeling for RV noise from the star) can reach to better than 30 cm/s. This goal places challenging requirements on every aspect of the instrument development, including optomechanical design, environmental control, image stabilization, wavelength calibration, and data analysis. In this paper we describe our error budget, and instrument optomechanical design.

Paper Details

Date Published: 9 August 2016
PDF: 20 pages
Proc. SPIE 9908, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, 99086T (9 August 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2233002
Show Author Affiliations
C. Jurgenson, Yale Univ. (United States)
D. Fischer, Yale Univ. (United States)
T. McCracken, Yale Univ. (United States)
D. Sawyer, Yale Univ. (United States)
A. Szymkowiak, Yale Univ. (United States)
A. Davis, Yale Univ. (United States)
G. Muller, ASTRO Electro-Mechanical Engineering, LLC (United States)
F. Santoro, ASTRO Electro-Mechanical Engineering, LLC (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9908:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI
Christopher J. Evans; Luc Simard; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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