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Proceedings Paper

Characterization of the ASPIICS/OPSE metrology sub-system and PSF centroiding procedure
Author(s): D. Loreggia; S. Fineschi; G. Capobianco; A. Bemporad; M. Focardi; F. Landini; G. Massone; M. Casti; G. Nicolini; M. Pancrazi; M. Romoli; V. Noce; C. Baccani; I. Cernica; M. Purica; M. Nisulescu; C. Thizy; J. S. Servaye; E. Renotte
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Paper Abstract

years have raised increasing interest. Many applications of astronomical observation techniques, as coronography and interferometry get great benefit when moved in space and the employment of diluted systems represents a milestone to step-over in astronomical research. In this work, we present the Optical Position Sensors Emitter (OPSE) metrological sub-system on-board of the PROBA3. PROBA3 is an ESA technology mission that will test in-orbit many metrology techniques for the maintenance of a Formation Flying with two satellites, in this case an occulter and a main satellite housing a coronagraph named ASPIICS, kept at an average inter-distance of 144m. The scientific task is the observation of the Sun’s Corona at high spatial and temporal resolution down to 1.08R⊙. The OPSE will monitor the relative position of the two satellites and consists of 3 emitters positioned on the rear surface of the occulter, that will be observed by the coronagraph itself. A Centre of Gravity (CoG) algorithm is used to monitor the emitter’s PSF at the focal plane of the Coronagraph retrieving the Occulter position with respect to the main spacecraft. The 3σ location target accuracy is 300μm for lateral movement and 21cm for longitudinal movements. A description of the characterization tests on the OPSE LED sources, and of the design for a laboratory set-up for on ground testing is given with a preliminary assessment of the performances expected from the OPSE images centroiding algorithm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 July 2016
PDF: 13 pages
Proc. SPIE 9904, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave, 99045O (29 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2232378
Show Author Affiliations
D. Loreggia, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
S. Fineschi, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
G. Capobianco, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
A. Bemporad, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
M. Focardi, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri (Italy)
F. Landini, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri (Italy)
G. Massone, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
M. Casti, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
G. Nicolini, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Turin (Italy)
M. Pancrazi, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri (Italy)
M. Romoli, Univ. of Florence (Italy)
V. Noce, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri (Italy)
C. Baccani, INAF - Astrophysical Observatory of Arcetri (Italy)
I. Cernica, National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (Romania)
M. Purica, National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (Romania)
M. Nisulescu, National Institute for Research and Development in Microtechnologies (Romania)
C. Thizy, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
J. S. Servaye, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)
E. Renotte, Ctr. Spatial de Liège (Belgium)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9904:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Optical, Infrared, and Millimeter Wave
Howard A. MacEwen; Giovanni G. Fazio; Makenzie Lystrup; Natalie Batalha; Nicholas Siegler; Edward C. Tong, Editor(s)

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