Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

The FOXSI solar sounding rocket campaigns
Author(s): Lindsay Glesener; Säm Krucker; Steven Christe; Shin-nosuke Ishikawa; Juan Camilo Buitrago-Casas; Brian Ramsey; Mikhail Gubarev; Tadayuki Takahashi; Shin Watanabe; Shin'ichiro Takeda; Sasha Courtade; Paul Turin; Stephen McBride; Van Shourt; Jane Hoberman; Natalie Foster; Juliana Vievering
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The Focusing Optics X-ray Solar Imager (FOXSI) is, in its initial form, a sounding rocket experiment designed to apply the technique of focusing hard X-ray (HXR) optics to the study of fundamental questions about the high-energy Sun. Solar HXRs arise via bremsstrahlung from energetic electrons and hot plasma produced in solar flares and thus are one of the most direct diagnostics of are-accelerated electrons and the impulsive heating of the solar corona. Previous missions have always been limited in sensitivity and dynamic range by the use of indirect (Fourier) imaging due to the lack of availability of direct focusing optics, but technological advances now make direct focusing accessible in the HXR regime (as evidenced by the NuSTAR spacecraft and several suborbital missions). The FOXSI rocket experiment develops and optimizes HXR focusing telescopes for the unique scientific requirements of the Sun. To date, FOXSI has completed two successful flights on 2012 November 02 and 2014 December 11 and is funded for a third flight. This paper gives a brief overview of the experiment, which is sensitive to solar HXRs in the 4-20 keV range, describes its first two flights, and gives a preview of plans for FOXSI-3.

Paper Details

Date Published: 18 July 2016
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9905, Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray, 99050E (18 July 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2232262
Show Author Affiliations
Lindsay Glesener, Univ. of Minnesota (United States)
Säm Krucker, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Univ. of Applied Sciences and Arts Northwestern Switzerland (Switzerland)
Steven Christe, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Shin-nosuke Ishikawa, JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
Juan Camilo Buitrago-Casas, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Brian Ramsey, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Mikhail Gubarev, NASA Marshall Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Tadayuki Takahashi, JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Shin Watanabe, JAXA Institute of Space and Astronautical Science (Japan)
Univ. of Tokyo (Japan)
Shin'ichiro Takeda, Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (Japan)
Sasha Courtade, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Paul Turin, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Stephen McBride, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Van Shourt, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Jane Hoberman, Space Sciences Lab., Univ. of California, Berkeley (United States)
Natalie Foster, Univ. of Texas at Austin (United States)
Juliana Vievering, Univ. of Minnesota (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9905:
Space Telescopes and Instrumentation 2016: Ultraviolet to Gamma Ray
Jan-Willem A. den Herder; Tadayuki Takahashi; Marshall Bautz, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top