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Proceedings Paper

The GMOX science case: resolving galaxies through cosmic time
Author(s): Mario Gennaro; Massimo Robberto; Timothy Heckman; Stephen A. Smee; Robert Barkhouser; Zoran Ninkov; Angela Adamo; George Becker; Andrea Bellini; Luciana Bianchi; Arjan Bik; Rongmon Bordoloi; Annalisa Calamida; Daniela Calzetti; Gisella De Rosa; Susana Deustua; Jason Kalirai; Jennifer Lotz; John MacKenty; Carlo Felice Manara; Margaret Meixner; Camilla Pacifici; Elena Sabbi; Kailash Sahu; Jason Tumlinson
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Paper Abstract

We present the key scientific questions that can be addressed by GMOX, a Multi-Object Spectrograph selected for feasibility study as a 4th generation instrument for the Gemini telescopes. Using commercial digital micro-mirror devices (DMDs) as slit selection mechanisms, GMOX can observe hundreds of sources at R~5000 between the U and K band simultaneously. Exploiting the narrow PSF delivered by the Gemini South GeMS MCAO module, GMOX can synthesize slits as small as 40mas reaching extremely faint magnitude limits, and thus enabling a plethora of applications and innovative science. Our main scientific driver in developing GMOX has been Resolving galaxies through cosmic time: GMOX 40mas slit (at GeMS) corresponds to 300 pc at z ~ 1:5, where the angular diameter distance reaches its maximum, and therefore to even smaller linear scales at any other redshift. This means that GMOX can take spectra of regions smaller than 300 pc in the whole observable Universe, allowing to probe the growth and evolution of galaxies with unprecedented detail. GMOXs multi-object capability and high angular resolution enable efficient studies of crowded fields, such as globular clusters, the Milky Way bulge, the Magellanic Clouds, Local Group galaxies and galaxy clusters. The wide-band simultaneous coverage and the very fast slit configuration mechanisms also make GMOX ideal for follow-up of LSST transients.

Paper Details

Date Published: 30 November 2016
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Proc. SPIE 9908, Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI, 990849 (30 November 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2232101
Show Author Affiliations
Mario Gennaro, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Massimo Robberto, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Timothy Heckman, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Stephen A. Smee, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Robert Barkhouser, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Zoran Ninkov, Rochester Institute of Technology (United States)
Angela Adamo, Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)
George Becker, Univ. of California, Riverside (United States)
Andrea Bellini, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Luciana Bianchi, Johns Hopkins Univ. (United States)
Arjan Bik, Stockholm Univ. (Sweden)
Rongmon Bordoloi, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (United States)
Annalisa Calamida, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Daniela Calzetti, Univ. of Massachusetts Amherst (United States)
Gisella De Rosa, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Susana Deustua, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Jason Kalirai, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Jennifer Lotz, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
John MacKenty, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Carlo Felice Manara, European Space Agency (France)
Margaret Meixner, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Camilla Pacifici, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Elena Sabbi, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Kailash Sahu, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)
Jason Tumlinson, Space Telescope Science Institute (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9908:
Ground-based and Airborne Instrumentation for Astronomy VI
Christopher J. Evans; Luc Simard; Hideki Takami, Editor(s)

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