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Proceedings Paper

Global space-based inter-calibration system reflective solar calibration reference: from Aqua MODIS to S-NPP VIIRS
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Paper Abstract

The MODIS has successfully operated on-board the NASA’s EOS Terra and Aqua spacecraft for more than 16 and 14 years, respectively. MODIS instrument was designed with stringent calibration requirements and comprehensive on-board calibration capability. In the reflective solar spectral region, Aqua MODIS has performed better than Terra MODIS and, therefore, has been chosen by the Global Space-based Inter- Calibration System (GSICS) operational community as the calibration reference sensor in cross-sensor calibration and calibration inter-comparisons. For the same reason, it has also been used by a number of earth-observing sensors as their calibration reference. Considering that Aqua MODIS has already operated for nearly 14 years, it is essential to transfer its calibration to a follow-on reference sensor with a similar calibration capability and stable performance. The VIIRS is a follow-on instrument to MODIS and has many similar design features as MODIS, including their on-board calibrators (OBC). As a result, VIIRS is an ideal candidate to replace MODIS to serve as the future GSICS reference sensor. Since launch, the S-NPP VIIRS has already operated for more than 4 years and its overall performance has been extensively characterized and demonstrated to meet its overall design requirements. This paper provides an overview of Aqua MODIS and S-NPP VIIRS reflective solar bands (RSB) calibration methodologies and strategies, traceability, and their on-orbit performance. It describes and illustrates different methods and approaches that can be used to facilitate the calibration reference transfer, including the use of desert and Antarctic sites, deep convective clouds (DCC), and the lunar observations.

Paper Details

Date Published: 2 May 2016
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9881, Earth Observing Missions and Sensors: Development, Implementation, and Characterization IV, 98811D (2 May 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2224320
Show Author Affiliations
Xiaoxiong Xiong, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Amit Angal, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
James Butler, NASA Goddard Space Flight Ctr. (United States)
Changyong Cao, NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (United States)
David Doelling, NASA Langley Research Ctr. (United States)
Aisheng Wu, Science Systems and Applications, Inc. (United States)
Xiangqian Wu, NOAA National Environmental Satellite, Data, and Information Service (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9881:
Earth Observing Missions and Sensors: Development, Implementation, and Characterization IV
Xiaoxiong J. Xiong; Saji Abraham Kuriakose; Toshiyoshi Kimura, Editor(s)

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