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Proceedings Paper

Frequency-stable, high-power, diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser
Author(s): Klaus Wallmeroth; Rudolf Letterer
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Paper Abstract

For application in coherent free-space optical communication a high-power (500mW) singIe-frequency diode-laser-pumped Nd:YAG laser has been developed. By active frequency stabilisation a linewidth of less then 10 kHz has been achieved. L EXPERIMENTS A twisted-mode (TMC) technique1''2 has been applied to obtain a high-power singlefrequency laser radiation at 1. 064 zm wavelength3''4 . The output power of 500 mW was only limited by the available diode-laser pump power. The linewidth of the free-running TMC-Nd:YAG-Iaser was about 100 kHz. Three different frequency stabilisation schemes have been applied to the TMC-laser to get a better frequency stability. By frequency offset locking of the TMC-laser to a frequency stable low-power reference laser5 a heterodyne linewidth of less than 10 kHz could be achieved. The excellent spectral properties of the reference laser were transferred to the high-power laser. By a heterodyne technique with a second low-power laser a optical communication DPSK system of 565 Mbit/s could be demonstrated. By locking the TMClaser to an external ultrastable cavity a linidth in the subkilo hertz region can be achieved6''7. This frequency-stable laser has been taken as a masteroscillator for a 18 W single-frequency Nd:YAG-laser which should be used to measure gravitational waves by interferometry. Locking to a molecular resonance line leads to an absolute frequency reference laser. To get data about Cesium lines high-resolution measurements have been made in comparison to Iodine lines which were measured by

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 July 1990
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 1319, Optics in Complex Systems, (1 July 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.22239
Show Author Affiliations
Klaus Wallmeroth, DLR (Germany)
Rudolf Letterer, DLR (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1319:
Optics in Complex Systems

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