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Proceedings Paper

Clinical experience using the tethered capsule-based spectrally encoded confocal microendoscopy for diagnosis of eosinophilic esophagitis (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Dukho Do; Sanaz Alali; DongKyun Kang; Nima Tabatabaie; Weina Lu; Catriona N. Grant; Amna R. Soomro; Norman S. Nishioka; Mireille Rosenberg; Paul E. Hesterberg; Qian Yuan; John J. Garber; Aubrey J. Katz; Wayne G. Shreffler; Guillermo J. Tearney

Paper Abstract

Eosinophilic Esophagitis (EoE) is caused by food allergies, and defined by histological presence of eosinophil cells in the esophagus. The current gold standard for EoE diagnosis is endoscopy with pinch biopsy to detect more than 15 eosinophils/ High power field (HPF). Biopsy examinations are expensive, time consuming and are difficult to tolerate for patients. Spectrally encoded confocal microscopy (SECM) is a high-speed reflectance confocal microscopy technology capable of imaging individual eosinophils as highly scattering cells (diameter between 8 µm to 15 µm) in the epithelium. Our lab has developed a tethered SECM capsule that can be swallowed by unsedated patients. The capsule acquires large area confocal images, equivalent to more than 30,000 HPFs, as it traverses through the esophagus. In this paper, we present the outcome of a clinical study using the tethered SECM capsule for diagnosing EoE. To date, 32 subjects have been enrolled in this study. 88% of the subjects swallowed the capsules without difficulty and of those who swallowed the capsule, 95% preferred the tethered capsule imaging procedure to sedated endoscopic biopsy. Each imaging session took about 12 ± 2.4 minutes during which 8 images each spanning of 24 ± 5 cm2 of the esophagus were acquired. SECM images acquired from EoE patients showed abundant eosinophils as highly scattering cells in squamous epithelium. Results from this study suggest that the SECM capsule has the potential to become a less-invasive, cost-effective tool for diagnosing EoE and monitoring the response of this disease to therapy.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 May 2016
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 9691, Endoscopic Microscopy XI; and Optical Techniques in Pulmonary Medicine III, 96910L (3 May 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2218559
Show Author Affiliations
Dukho Do, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Sanaz Alali, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
DongKyun Kang, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Nima Tabatabaie, York Univ. (Canada)
Weina Lu, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Catriona N. Grant, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Amna R. Soomro, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Norman S. Nishioka, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Mireille Rosenberg, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Paul E. Hesterberg, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Qian Yuan, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
John J. Garber, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Aubrey J. Katz, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Wayne G. Shreffler, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)
Guillermo J. Tearney, Wellman Ctr. for Photomedicine, Massachusetts General Hospital (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9691:
Endoscopic Microscopy XI; and Optical Techniques in Pulmonary Medicine III
Melissa J. Suter; Guillermo J. Tearney; Thomas D. Wang; Stephen Lam; Matthew Brenner, Editor(s)

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