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Proceedings Paper

Investigating the relationship between subjective drug craving and temporal dynamics of the default mode network, executive control network, and salience network in methamphetamine dependents using rsfMRI
Author(s): Somayyeh Soltanian-Zadeh; Gholam-Ali Hossein-Zadeh; Alireza Shahbabaie; Hamed Ekhtiari
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Paper Abstract

Resting state functional connectivity (rsFC) studies using fMRI provides a great deal of knowledge on the spatiotemporal organization of the brain. The relationships between and within a number of resting state functional networks, namely the default mode network (DMN), salience network (SN) and executive control network (ECN) have been intensely studied in basic and clinical cognitive neuroscience [1]. However, the presumption of spatial and temporal stationarity has mostly restricted the assessment of rsFC [1]. In this study, sliding window correlation analysis and k-means clustering were exploited to examine the temporal dynamics of rsFC of these three networks in 24 abstinent methamphetamine dependents. Afterwards, using canonical correlation analysis (CCA) the possible relationship between the level of self-reported craving and the temporal dynamics was examined. Results indicate that the rsFC transits between 6 discrete "FC states" in the meth dependents. CCA results show that higher levels of craving are associated with higher probability of transiting from state 4 to 6 (positive FC of DMN-ECN getting weak and negative FC of DMN-SN appearing) and staying in state 4 (positive FC of DMN-ECN), lower probability of staying in state 2 (negative FC of DMN-ECN), transiting from state 4 to 2 (change of positive FC of DMN-ECN to negative FC), and transiting from state 3 to 5 (appearance of negative FC of DMN-SN and positive FC of DMN-ECN with the presence of negative FC of SN-ECN). Quantitative measures of temporal dynamics in large-scale brain networks could bring new added values to increase potentials for applications of rsfMRI in addiction medicine.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 March 2016
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9788, Medical Imaging 2016: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging, 978826 (29 March 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2217214
Show Author Affiliations
Somayyeh Soltanian-Zadeh, Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Gholam-Ali Hossein-Zadeh, Univ. of Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Institute for Research in Fundamental Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Alireza Shahbabaie, Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Institute for Cognitive Science Studies (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Hamed Ekhtiari, Tehran Univ. of Medical Sciences (Iran, Islamic Republic of)
Institute for Cognitive Science Studies (Iran, Islamic Republic of)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9788:
Medical Imaging 2016: Biomedical Applications in Molecular, Structural, and Functional Imaging
Barjor Gimi; Andrzej Krol, Editor(s)

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