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Proceedings Paper

Conceptual detector development and Monte Carlo simulation of a novel 3D breast computed tomography system
Author(s): Jens Ziegle; Bernhard H. Müller; Bernd Neumann; Christoph Hoeschen
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Paper Abstract

A new 3D breast computed tomography (CT) system is under development enabling imaging of microcalcifications in a fully uncompressed breast including posterior chest wall tissue. The system setup uses a steered electron beam impinging on small tungsten targets surrounding the breast to emit X-rays. A realization of the corresponding detector concept is presented in this work and it is modeled through Monte Carlo simulations in order to quantify first characteristics of transmission and secondary photons. The modeled system comprises a vertical alignment of linear detectors hold by a case that also hosts the breast. Detectors are separated by gaps to allow the passage of X-rays towards the breast volume. The detectors located directly on the opposite side of the gaps detect incident X-rays. Mechanically moving parts in an imaging system increase the duration of image acquisition and thus can cause motion artifacts. So, a major advantage of the presented system design is the combination of the fixed detectors and the fast steering electron beam which enable a greatly reduced scan time. Thereby potential motion artifacts are reduced so that the visualization of small structures such as microcalcifications is improved. The result of the simulation of a single projection shows high attenuation by parts of the detector electronics causing low count levels at the opposing detectors which would require a flat field correction, but it also shows a secondary to transmission ratio of all counted X-rays of less than 1 percent. Additionally, a single slice with details of various sizes was reconstructed using filtered backprojection. The smallest detail which was still visible in the reconstructed image has a size of 0.2mm.

Paper Details

Date Published: 29 March 2016
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9783, Medical Imaging 2016: Physics of Medical Imaging, 97832C (29 March 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2216965
Show Author Affiliations
Jens Ziegle, Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg (Germany)
Bernhard H. Müller, Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg (Germany)
Bernd Neumann, Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg (Germany)
Christoph Hoeschen, Otto-von-Guericke Univ. Magdeburg (Germany)
Helmholtz Zentrum München German Research Ctr. for Environmental Health (Germany)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9783:
Medical Imaging 2016: Physics of Medical Imaging
Despina Kontos; Thomas G. Flohr, Editor(s)

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