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Proceedings Paper

Imaging of skin surface architecture with out of plane polarimetry (Conference Presentation)
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Paper Abstract

Knowledge of skin surface topography is of great importance when establishing environmental and age related skin damage. Furthermore an effective treatment protocol cannot be established without a quantitative measuring tool that is able to establish significant improvement in skin texture. We utilized an out-of-plane polarimeter for the characterization of skin surface profile non-invasively. The system consists of an imaging Stokes vector polarimeter where the light source and imaging apparatus are arranged at an angle equal to forty degrees with respect to the tissue normal. The light source is rotated at various azimuth angles about the tissue normal. For each position of the incident beam the principal angle of polarization is calculated. This parameter relates indirectly to surface profile and architecture. The system was used to image the forehead and hands of healthy volunteers between eighteen and sixty years of age. A clear separation appeared among different age groups, establishing out-of-plane polarimetry as a promising technique for skin topography quantification.

Paper Details

Date Published: 27 April 2016
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 9689, Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics XII, 96890C (27 April 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2213365
Show Author Affiliations
Joseph Chue-Sang, Florida International Univ. (United States)
Jessica C. Ramella-Roman, Florida International Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9689:
Photonic Therapeutics and Diagnostics XII
Hyun Wook Kang; Guillermo J. Tearney M.D.; Melissa C. Skala; Bernard Choi; Andreas Mandelis; Brian J. F. Wong M.D.; Justus F. Ilgner M.D.; Nikiforos Kollias; Paul J. Campagnola; Kenton W. Gregory M.D.; Laura Marcu; Haishan Zeng, Editor(s)

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