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Proceedings Paper

Selective control of small versus large diameter axons using infrared laser light (Conference Presentation)
Author(s): Emilie H. Lothet; Kendrick M. Shaw; Charles C. Horn; Hui Lu; Yves T. Wang; E. Duco Jansen; Hillel J. Chiel; Michael W. Jenkins

Paper Abstract

Sensory information is conveyed to the central nervous system via small diameter unmyelinated fibers. In general, smaller diameter axons have slower conduction velocities. Selective control of such fibers could create new clinical treatments for chronic pain, nausea in response to chemo-therapeutic agents, or hypertension. Electrical stimulation can control axonal activity, but induced axonal current is proportional to cross-sectional area, so that large diameter fibers are affected first. Physiologically, however, synaptic inputs generally affect small diameter fibers before large diameter fibers (the size principle). A more physiological modality that first affected small diameter fibers could have fewer side effects (e.g., not recruiting motor axons). A novel mathematical analysis of the cable equation demonstrates that the minimum length along the axon for inducing block scales with the square root of axon diameter. This implies that the minimum length along an axon for inhibition will scale as the square root of axon diameter, so that lower radiant exposures of infrared light will selectively affect small diameter, slower conducting fibers before those of large diameter. This prediction was tested in identified neurons from the marine mollusk Aplysia californica. Radiant exposure to block a neuron with a slower conduction velocity (B43) was consistently lower than that needed to block a faster conduction velocity neuron (B3). Furthermore, in the vagus nerve of the musk shrew, lower radiant exposure blocked slow conducting fibers before blocking faster conducting fibers. Infrared light can selectively control smaller diameter fibers, suggesting many novel clinical treatments.

Paper Details

Date Published: 26 April 2016
PDF: 1 pages
Proc. SPIE 9690, Clinical and Translational Neurophotonics; Neural Imaging and Sensing; and Optogenetics and Optical Manipulation, 96901N (26 April 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2212945
Show Author Affiliations
Emilie H. Lothet, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Kendrick M. Shaw, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Charles C. Horn, Univ. of Pittsburgh Cancer Institute (United States)
Hui Lu, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Yves T. Wang, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
E. Duco Jansen, Vanderbilt Univ. (United States)
Hillel J. Chiel, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)
Michael W. Jenkins, Case Western Reserve Univ. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9690:
Clinical and Translational Neurophotonics; Neural Imaging and Sensing; and Optogenetics and Optical Manipulation
Steen J. Madsen; E. Duco Jansen; Samarendra K. Mohanty; Nitish V. Thakor; Qingming Luo; Victor X. D. Yang, Editor(s)

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