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Proceedings Paper

Universal filtered multi-carrier system for asynchronous uplink transmission in optical access network
Author(s): Soo-Min Kang; Chang-Hun Kim; Sang-Kook Han
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Paper Abstract

In passive optical network (PON), orthogonal frequency division multiplexing (OFDM) has been studied actively due to its advantages such as high spectra efficiency (SE), dynamic resource allocation in time or frequency domain, and dispersion robustness. However, orthogonal frequency division multiple access (OFDMA)-PON requires tight synchronization among multiple access signals. If not, frequency orthogonality could not be maintained. Also its sidelobe causes inter-channel interference (ICI) to adjacent channel. To prevent ICI caused by high sidelobes, guard band (GB) is usually used which degrades SE. Thus, OFDMA-PON is not suitable for asynchronous uplink transmission in optical access network. In this paper, we propose intensity modulation/direct detection (IM/DD) based universal filtered multi-carrier (UFMC) PON for asynchronous multiple access. The UFMC uses subband filtering to subsets of subcarriers. Since it reduces sidelobe of each subband by applying subband filtering, it could achieve better performance compared to OFDM. For the experimental demonstration, different sample delay was applied to subbands to implement asynchronous transmission condition. As a result, time synchronization robustness of UFMC was verified in asynchronous multiple access system.

Paper Details

Date Published: 12 February 2016
PDF: 8 pages
Proc. SPIE 9772, Broadband Access Communication Technologies X, 97720W (12 February 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2210749
Show Author Affiliations
Soo-Min Kang, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Chang-Hun Kim, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)
Sang-Kook Han, Yonsei Univ. (Korea, Republic of)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9772:
Broadband Access Communication Technologies X
Benjamin B. Dingel; Katsutoshi Tsukamoto, Editor(s)

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