Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Engineering molecularly-active nanoplasmonic surfaces for DNA detection via colorimetry and Raman scattering
Author(s): Esmaeil Heydari; Samuel Mabbott; David Thompson; Duncan Graham; Jonathan M. Cooper; Alasdair W. Clark
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

We report a novel nanophotonic biosensor surface capable of both colorimetric detection and Raman-scattered detection of DNA infection markers at extreme sensitivities. Combining direct-write lithography, dip-pen nanolithography based DNA patterning, and molecular self-assembly, we create molecularly-active plasmonic nanostructures onto which metallic nanoparticles are located via DNA-hybridization. Arraying these structures enables optical surfaces that change state when contacted by specific DNA sequences; shifting the surface color while simultaneously generating strong Raman-scattering signals. Patterning the DNA markers onto the plasmonic surface as micro-scale symbols results in easily identifiable color shifts, making this technique applicable to multiplexed lab-on-a-chip and point-of-care diagnostic applications.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 April 2016
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 9721, Nanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XIII, 972105 (22 April 2016); doi: 10.1117/12.2209108
Show Author Affiliations
Esmaeil Heydari, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Samuel Mabbott, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
David Thompson, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
Duncan Graham, Univ. of Strathclyde (United Kingdom)
Jonathan M. Cooper, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)
Alasdair W. Clark, Univ. of Glasgow (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9721:
Nanoscale Imaging, Sensing, and Actuation for Biomedical Applications XIII
Alexander N. Cartwright; Dan V. Nicolau; Dror Fixler, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top