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Proceedings Paper • Open Access

Introducing and engaging diverse high school students to biophotonics through multi-year courses
Author(s): Marco Molinaro; Pamela Castori; Mike Wright; Ana Corbacho

Paper Abstract

The National Science Foundation (NSF) funded Center for Biophotonics Science and Technology (CBST) has created various high school biophotonics research academies for both students and teachers from diverse socioeconomic backgrounds. These academies engage diverse students for 10 hours to over 350 hours per year for multiple years with an emphasis on learning the basics of biophotonics and then conducting original, team-based research. We have developed three versions of the academy, one focused on biology and biophotonics, one on cancer and biophotonics, and a third on plants and biophotonics. A fourth emphasis on biomedical engineering and biophotonics is planned. We have conducted one of these academies for three years and have had very good student retention and science fair winners. As part of our program we also have a summer academy for training teachers. Challenges have arisen amongst the various levels of Academies, chief among them sustainability. In the future, more extensive evaluation, curriculum consolidation, and widespread dissemination are critical.

Paper Details

Date Published: 3 June 2007
PDF: 7 pages
Proc. SPIE 9665, Tenth International Topical Meeting on Education and Training in Optics and Photonics, 96651A (3 June 2007); doi: 10.1117/12.2207532
Show Author Affiliations
Marco Molinaro, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Pamela Castori, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Mike Wright, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)
Ana Corbacho, Univ. of California, Davis (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9665:
Tenth International Topical Meeting on Education and Training in Optics and Photonics
Marc Nantel, Editor(s)

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