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Proceedings Paper

Comparative performance of intensity modulation schemes for HDTV transmission on single-mode fibre
Author(s): John M. Senior; D. T. Lambert; David W. Faulkner
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Paper Abstract

This paper builds upon earlier work concerned with high definition television (HDTV) transmission for application in the future optical fibre local telephone network. The HDTV signal is introduced by reference to the NHK system originating in Japan and the HD-MAC system supported in Europe. Both digital and analogue intensity modulation schemes for HDTV transmission on single mode fibre are then assessed in relation to transmission bandwidth, receiver signal to noise ratio, multiplexing capabilities, terminal complexity and cost. The practical implementation of a high speed pulse code modulated (P04) HDTV single mode fibre transmission system is then discussed. Details of the implementation of a sub-carrier frequency modulation (SCFM) system are then followed by a description of the practical realisation of a novel wideband pulse frequency modulation (PFM) system again for HDTV transmission on single mode fibre. Modification of this latter system for square wave frequency modulation (SWFM) is then discussed. Finally performance data on the aforementioned systems are presented and compared in order to determine specific trade-offs associated with these modulation techniques for optical fibre HDTV transmission.

Paper Details

Date Published: 1 September 1990
PDF: 10 pages
Proc. SPIE 1314, Fibre Optics '90, (1 September 1990); doi: 10.1117/12.21968
Show Author Affiliations
John M. Senior, Manchester Polytechnic (United Kingdom)
D. T. Lambert, Manchester Polytechnic (United Kingdom)
David W. Faulkner, British Telecom Research Labs. (United Kingdom)

Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 1314:
Fibre Optics '90

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