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Proceedings Paper

Soft x-ray laser ablation mass spectrometry for materials study and nanoscale chemical imaging
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Paper Abstract

There are significant advantages for using a compact capillary discharge soft x-ray laser (SXRL) with wavelength of 46.9 nm for mass spectrometry applications. The 26.4 eV energy photons provide efficient single-photon ionization while preserving the structure of molecules and clusters. The tens of nanometers absorption depth of the radiation coupled with the focusing of the laser beam to diameter of ∼100 nm result in the ablation of atto-liter scale craters which in turn enable high resolution mass spectral imaging of solid samples. In this paper we describe results on the analysis of composition depth-profiling of multilayer oxide stack and material studies in photoresists, ionic crystals, and magnesium corrosion products using SXRL ablation mass spectrometry, a method first demonstrated by our group. These materials are used in a variety of soft x-ray applications such as detectors, multilayer optics, and many more.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 September 2015
PDF: 9 pages
Proc. SPIE 9589, X-Ray Lasers and Coherent X-Ray Sources: Development and Applications XI, 958905 (22 September 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2188645
Show Author Affiliations
Ilya Kuznetsov, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
Tomas Burian, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Libor Juha, Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)
Regina Soufli, Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (United States)
Jorge Filevich, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
M. Woolston, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
Elliot R. Bernstein, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
Dean C. Crick, Colorado State Univ. (United States)
D. Carlton, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
W. Chao, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
E. H. Anderson, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (United States)
Jorge J. Rocca, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
Carmen S. Menoni, NSF Ctr. for Extreme Ultraviolet Science and Technology (United States)
Colorado State Univ. (United States)
Institute of Physics of the ASCR, v.v.i. (Czech Republic)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9589:
X-Ray Lasers and Coherent X-Ray Sources: Development and Applications XI
Annie Klisnick; Carmen S. Menoni, Editor(s)

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