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Proceedings Paper

Live HDR video streaming on commodity hardware
Author(s): Joshua McNamee; Jonathan Hatchett; Kurt Debattista; Alan Chalmers
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Paper Abstract

High Dynamic Range (HDR) video provides a step change in viewing experience, for example the ability to clearly see the soccer ball when it is kicked from the shadow of the stadium into sunshine. To achieve the full potential of HDR video, so-called true HDR, it is crucial that all the dynamic range that was captured is delivered to the display device and tone mapping is confined only to the display. Furthermore, to ensure widespread uptake of HDR imaging, it should be low cost and available on commodity hardware. This paper describes an end-to-end HDR pipeline for capturing, encoding and streaming high-definition HDR video in real-time using off-the-shelf components. All the lighting that is captured by HDR-enabled consumer cameras is delivered via the pipeline to any display, including HDR displays and even mobile devices with minimum latency. The system thus provides an integrated HDR video pipeline that includes everything from capture to post-production, archival and storage, compression, transmission, and display.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 September 2015
PDF: 11 pages
Proc. SPIE 9599, Applications of Digital Image Processing XXXVIII, 95990U (22 September 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2187457
Show Author Affiliations
Joshua McNamee, Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
goHDR Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Jonathan Hatchett, Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
goHDR Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Kurt Debattista, Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
goHDR Ltd. (United Kingdom)
Alan Chalmers, Univ. of Warwick (United Kingdom)
goHDR Ltd. (United Kingdom)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9599:
Applications of Digital Image Processing XXXVIII
Andrew G. Tescher, Editor(s)

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