Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

The Thermal Infrared Compact Imaging Spectrometer (TIRCIS): a follow-on to the Space Ultra Compact Hyperspectral Imager (SUCHI)
Author(s): S. T. Crites; R. Wright; P. G. Lucey; J. Chan; A. Gabrieli; H. Garbeil; K. A. Horton; A. K. R. Imai-Hong; E. J. Pilger; M. Wood; L. Yoneshige
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00

Paper Abstract

The Thermal Infrared Compact Imaging Spectrometer (TIRCIS) is a long wave infrared (LWIR, 8-14 microns) hyperspectral imager designed as the follow-on to the University of Hawaii’s SUCHI (Space Ultra Compact Hyperspectral Imager). SUCHI is a low-mass (<9kg), low-volume (10x12x40cm3) LWIR spectrometer designed as the primary payload on the University of Hawaii-built 'HiakaSat' microsatellite. SUCHI is based on a variable-gap Fabry Perot interferometer employed as a Fourier transform spectrometer with images collected by a commercial off-the-shelf microbolometer contained inside a 1-atm sealed vessel. The sensor has been fully integrated with the HiakaSat microsatellite and is awaiting launch in 2015. The TIRCIS instrument is based on the same principles but takes lessons learned from SUCHI and applies them to a new design with improvements in spatial resolution, spectral resolution and spectral responsivity. The TIRCIS instrument is based on an uncooled microbolometer array with custom detector coatings to enhance responsivity towards 7 microns. Like SUCHI, TIRCIS utilizes a variable-gap Fabry Perot interferometer to create the spectra, but three different interferometer wedges with varying slopes resulting in spectral resolution ranging from 44 cm-1 to 6.5 cm-1 will be tested to explore tradeoffs between spectral resolution and sensitivity. TIRCIS is designed to achieve 120 m spatial resolution, compared with 230 m for SUCHI, from a theoretical 500 km orbit. It will be used for ground and aircraft data collection but will undergo environmental testing to demonstrate its relevance to the space environment. TIRCIS has been fully designed and is entering fabrication, with an operational instrument to be delivered in October, 2015.

Paper Details

Date Published: 22 May 2015
PDF: 12 pages
Proc. SPIE 9469, Sensors and Systems for Space Applications VIII, 94690R (22 May 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2185649
Show Author Affiliations
S. T. Crites, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
R. Wright, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
P. G. Lucey, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
J. Chan, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
A. Gabrieli, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
H. Garbeil, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
K. A. Horton, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
A. K. R. Imai-Hong, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
E. J. Pilger, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
M. Wood, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)
L. Yoneshige, Univ. of Hawai'i at Manoa (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9469:
Sensors and Systems for Space Applications VIII
Khanh D. Pham; Genshe Chen, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top