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Proceedings Paper

Tumor tissue characterization using polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation microscopy
Author(s): Danielle Tokarz; Richard Cisek; Ahmad Golaraei; Serguei Krouglov; Roya Navab; Carolyn Niu; Shingo Sakashita; Kazuhiro Yasufuku; Ming-Sound Tsao; Sylvia L. Asa; Virginijus Barzda; Brian C. Wilson
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Paper Abstract

Changes in the ultrastructure of collagen in various tumor and non-tumor human tissues including lung, pancreas and thyroid were investigated ex vivo by a polarization-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy technique referred to as polarization-in, polarization-out (PIPO) SHG. This involves measuring the orientation of the linear polarization of outgoing SHG as a function of the linear polarization orientation of incident laser radiation. From the PIPO SHG data, the second-order nonlinear optical susceptibility tensor component ratio, χ(2) ZZZ’/χ(2) ZXX’, for each pixel of the SHG image was obtained and presented as color-coded maps. Further, the orientation of collagen fibers in the tissue was deduced. Since the χ(2) ZZZ’/χ(2) ZXX’ values represent the organization of collagen in the tissue, theses maps revealed areas of altered collagen structure (not simply concentration) within tissue sections. Statistically-significant differences in χ(2) ZZZ’/χ(2) ZXX’ were found between tumor and non-tumor tissues, which varied from organ to organ. Hence, PIPO SHG microscopy could potentially be used to aid pathologists in diagnosing cancer. Additionally, PIPO SHG microscopy could aid in characterizing the structure of collagen in other collagen-related biological processes such as wound repair.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 June 2015
PDF: 6 pages
Proc. SPIE 9531, Biophotonics South America, 95310C (19 June 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2180969
Show Author Affiliations
Danielle Tokarz, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Richard Cisek, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Univ. of Toronto Mississauga (Canada)
Ahmad Golaraei, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Univ. of Toronto Mississauga (Canada)
Serguei Krouglov, Univ. of Toronto Mississauga (Canada)
Roya Navab, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Carolyn Niu, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Shingo Sakashita, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Kazuhiro Yasufuku, Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Ming-Sound Tsao, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Sylvia L. Asa, Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Virginijus Barzda, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)
Univ. of Toronto Mississauga (Canada)
Brian C. Wilson, Princess Margaret Cancer Ctr., Univ. Health Network, Univ. of Toronto (Canada)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9531:
Biophotonics South America
Cristina Kurachi; Katarina Svanberg; Bruce J. Tromberg; Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato, Editor(s)

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