Share Email Print
cover

Proceedings Paper

Evaluation of the variable depth resolution of active dynamic thermography on human skin
Author(s): Nicholas J. Prindeze; Hilary A. Hoffman; Bonnie C. Carney; Lauren T. Moffatt; Murray H. Loew; Jeffrey W. Shupp
Format Member Price Non-Member Price
PDF $14.40 $18.00
cover GOOD NEWS! Your organization subscribes to the SPIE Digital Library. You may be able to download this paper for free. Check Access

Paper Abstract

Active dynamic thermography (ADT) is an imaging technique capable of characterizing the non-homogenous thermal conductance of damaged tissues. The purpose of this study was to determine optimal stimulation parameters and quantify the optical resolution of ADT through various depths of human skin. Excised tissue from plastic surgery operations was collected immediately following excision. A total of 12 thin to thick split-thickness grafts were harvested from 3 patients. Grafts were placed on top of a 3D printed resolution chart and thermal stimulation was applied from a 300W halogen lamp array for between 0.5-10 seconds to determine optimal parameters. Video was captured with a thermal camera, and analysis was performed by reconstructing an image from thermal gradients. In this study ADT resolved 0.445±0 lp/mm at a depth of 0.010”, 0.356±0.048 lp/mm at a depth of 0.015”, 0.334±0.027 lp/mm at a depth of 0.020” and 0.265±0.022 lp/mm at a depth of 0.025”. The stimulus energy required for maximum resolution at each depth was 3- 4s, 8s, 12s and 12s respectively. ADT is a sensitive technique for imaging dermal structure, capable of resolving detail as fine as 1124 μm, 1427 μm, 1502 μm and 1893 μm in thin to thick split-thickness skin grafts respectively. This study has characterized a correlation between stimulus input and maximal resolution at differing depths of skin. It has also defined the functional imaging depth of ADT to below the sub-cutis, well below conventional spectrophotometric techniques.

Paper Details

Date Published: 19 June 2015
PDF: 5 pages
Proc. SPIE 9531, Biophotonics South America, 95310P (19 June 2015); doi: 10.1117/12.2180807
Show Author Affiliations
Nicholas J. Prindeze, Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research Lab., MedStar Health Research Institute (United States)
Hilary A. Hoffman, Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research Lab., MedStar Health Research Institute (United States)
Bonnie C. Carney, Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research Lab., MedStar Health Research Institute (United States)
Lauren T. Moffatt, Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research Lab., MedStar Health Research Institute (United States)
Murray H. Loew, George Washington Univ. (United States)
Jeffrey W. Shupp, Firefighters' Burn and Surgical Research Lab., MedStar Health Research Institute (United States)
The Burn Ctr., MedStar Washington Hospital Ctr. (United States)


Published in SPIE Proceedings Vol. 9531:
Biophotonics South America
Cristina Kurachi; Katarina Svanberg; Bruce J. Tromberg; Vanderlei Salvador Bagnato, Editor(s)

© SPIE. Terms of Use
Back to Top